Firing

There’s danger in every aspect of firing, from WARN Act layoffs and exit interviews to constructive discharge and more.

Learn how to fire an employee and sidestep wrongful termination lawsuits, with battle-tested firing procedures, and employment termination letters. At last, you can fire at will!

Page 38 of 215« First...102030373839405060...Last »

If you're relying solely on your memory to evaluate employee performance, you're making appraisals far more difficult than necessary. That's why it's best to institute a simple recording system to document employee performance. The most useful, easy-to-implement way is to create and maintain a log for each person. Follow these six steps:

Supervisors can learn a lot from others' mistakes, particularly when it comes to employment law issues. Here are four recent court decisions that provide lessons on how supervisors can keep their organizations (and themselves) out of legal hot water.
How much your organization pays for unemployment in­­surance is based, in part, on how many of your former employees have successfully filed claims against you. Under­standing who is eligible for unemployment benefits and who isn’t can go a long way toward keeping insurance rates low. It starts with how you terminate an employee.

What’s weirder: Actor James Franco earning a D in a drama class, or a NYU professor alleging he got the ax for ­giving Franco the lousy grade? José Angel Santana, who taught Franco in a 2010 directing class, says the university was so eager to please its star student that it retaliated when Santana issued the low grade.

An employee has sued for religious discimination after he was fired from a plastics plant for refusing to wear a sticker saying 666, noting the number of days the plant has gone accident-free. The employee noted his “sincere religious belief that to wear the number 666 would be to accept the mark of the beast and be condemned to hell.”

Employers usually don’t have a problem terminating an em­­ployee for poor performance if the employee has never raised any kind of discrimination claim. But somehow, as soon as an employee goes to the EEOC (or even just HR) with a complaint, the same employer doesn’t know what to do. Should you terminate the em­­ployee and face a potential retaliation suit?

Did frank feedback about a boss’s shortcomings lead to a government worker’s firing? That’s what Rose Olmsted claims in a lawsuit she filed against the Freeborn County Com­­missioners and the county’s director of human services.
Whenever an employee reveals a disability, employers must explore reasonable accommodations. The EEOC clearly doesn’t consider it reasonable to send an employee home and then fire him, as the following case shows.

Employees may think that by making a request for FMLA leave, they can stop their employer’s legitimate disciplinary actions. That’s not true. Employers that can clearly establish an independent reason for discipline seldom lose an FMLA retaliation case.

When employees can’t find an attorney to handle their em­­ployment discrimination claims, they sometimes go it alone, filing their own EEOC complaints and then moving on to federal court. Even if so-called pro se litigants pre­sent confusing and seemingly contradictory cases, chances are a federal judge will expect the em­­ployer to respond.
Page 38 of 215« First...102030373839405060...Last »