There’s danger in every aspect of firing, from WARN Act layoffs and exit interviews to constructive discharge and more.

Learn how to fire an employee and sidestep wrongful termination lawsuits, with battle-tested firing procedures, and employment termination letters. At last, you can fire at will!

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If an employee alleges she lost her job during a reduction in force because of discrimination or retaliation, counter that claim by showing there were real economic reasons for letting her go.
Employers have the right to contest a former employee’s eligibility for unemployment benefits. Talk it over with your attorney first.
Workers don’t give up their First Amendment rights when they take a government job. But that doesn’t mean that they can say anything, anywhere.
It should be item No. 1 on the termination checklist.
Under Minnesota’s unemployment compensation rules, an employee’s single incident of misconduct can be grounds for discharge—and can keep the employee from collecting benefits if it was a serious violation.
Two former Wells Fargo employees who didn’t cheat in the bank’s ill-conceived incentive scheme to drive new business have filed a $2.6 million class-action lawsuit.
When deciding who stays and who goes during a reduction in force, use as many objective criteria as possible.
Employees who take FMLA leave are entitled to return to their old jobs or equivalent ones. But what if you learn during an employee’s time out on FMLA leave that she wasn’t everything you believed her to be?
HR pros can’t let sympathy for an employee who is out on extended medical leave—and whose job may be in jeopardy—affect the organization’s need to respond to business needs by restructuring.
Q. In recent months, a sharp decline in revenue has forced us to consider downsizing. What are the legal risks associated with a layoff, and how can we minimize them?
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