Firing

There’s danger in every aspect of firing, from WARN Act layoffs and exit interviews to constructive discharge and more.

Learn how to fire an employee and sidestep wrongful termination lawsuits, with battle-tested firing procedures, and employment termination letters. At last, you can fire at will!

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The job market is tough for poorly educated, untrained injured workers. However, unless you want to continue carrying such workers on your workers’ compensation policy rolls, it might be smart to do all you can to find light-duty jobs for them.

You’re probably aware that, generally, you should issue the same discipline to everyone who breaks the same rule. But that isn’t always the case. As long as you can explain why one employee deserved harsher punishment, a judge probably won’t second-guess you.

Problem: If an employee’s insubordinate behavior was caused by her bipolar disorder and you fire her, is the termination a violation of the Americans with Dis­­abil­­ities Act?
North Canton-based Star Air faces a DOL lawsuit that seeks more than $600,000 in fines and reinstatement for two drivers allegedly fired for re­­fusing to drive unsafe vehicles.
Have you had it with an em­­ployee who can’t seem to get along with others and who constantly tries to intimidate co-workers? If warnings don’t help, fire him.

Plenty of employees have chips on their shoulders. Some are hypersensitive to perceived slights and constructive criticism. Others get angry over minor problems. Acting out has long been regarded as insubordination and grounds for discipline, including termination.

You don’t have to put up with employees who can’t get along with others, raise their voices, slam doors and generally act as if they could explode into a rage at any moment. Those are legitimate firing offenses.

What should you do if one of your employees seems to be having difficulty coping well at work? Start by not jumping to conclusions about his mental health. Instead, focus on behavior and document any apparent problems. Then, based on that observation, consider asking for a fitness-for-duty examination.

Here’s a recipe for a lawsuit: Terminate a good employee who just told you she needs FMLA leave and has scheduled surgery. The timing alone will be enough to let the lawsuit proceed.
Hey, it happens: Sometimes, supervisors screw up. Go ahead and discipline them for their mistakes, even if you’re afraid your actions might trigger a discrimination or harassment lawsuit.
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