Employment Law

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Energy workers are protected from retaliation for reporting safety problems if their workplace is covered by the federal Energy Reorganization Act.
The U.S. Supreme Court has issued, at least temporarily, a reprieve from a potential death sentence for public employee unions.
The U.S. Supreme Court heard oral arguments March 28 in a case that asks if an employer can recover attorneys’ fees it spent successfully defending itself against a frivolous EEOC lawsuit.
The U.S. Department of Labor has filed a lawsuit against a Georgia foam manufacturer and three of its managers for suspending and terminating employees who reported workplace hazards in violation of the Occupational Safety and Health Act.
Regional Environmental Demolition in Niagara Falls faces a federal lawsuit alleging retaliation against a worker who reported a workplace hazard.

A new Department of Labor rule will limit employers’ ability to use “persuaders” to convince workers to resist union organizing efforts, critics say.

It’s a wage-and-hour lesson many employers learn the hard way: If you don’t have good records of hours worked, courts take employees’ word for how much time they put in.
The rules that govern employee efforts to better their working conditions are complex.
It can be as small as office supplies or as big as an embezzlement scheme, but your employees are likely stealing something from your company.
A guard at Lewisburg Federal Peni­­ten­­tiary has sued the Justice Depart­­ment after a federal inmate obtained his Social Security number and other personal data through a Freedom of Information Act request.
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