Employment Law

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A federal court in Texas has issued an injunction preventing a former salesperson for a plastics company from soliciting customers on behalf of his new employer. The competitor had hired the employee despite a nondisclosure and nonsolicitation agreement he had signed.
Q. We plan to start having supervisors listen in on trainees’ phone conversations with customers. Do we have to inform the caller that we’re listening? We think the “this call may be recorded” message makes the call less authentic?
The National Labor Relations Board’s Aug. 27 decision in Browning-Ferris, which redefined the concept of “joint employer,” sparked lots of buzz in the legal and business worlds. Here's a sampling.
The National Labor Relations Board on Aug. 27 scrapped decades of precedent with a decision that greatly expanded the definition of a “joint employer” to include entities that exert even indirect control over another organization’s employees.
The intermingling of personal and business computing is creating traps for employers. What are you allowed to see, alter, delete ... and take?
It’s official—professional cheerleaders are now recognized as employees under California law. In July, California Gov. Jerry Brown signed a bill requiring California professional sports teams to pay their cheerleaders at least the minimum wage.
A manager who has to fill in for subordinates when they are absent or because a position is vacant doesn’t necessarily lose exempt status.
Q. I keep hearing about the new Texas open-carry law. Does this law apply to all offices? What steps should I take if the new legislation has a negative impact on my business?
If you don’t act to prevent off-the-clock work, you could wind up having to defend against multiple lawsuits. That’s because, even if a nationwide class action suit isn’t certified, employees who weren’t involved in an initial lawsuit can sue on their own.
The National Labor Relations Board has ruled against Love Culture, purveyor of teen clothing, after it fired an employee from its St. Louis Park, Minn. store for discussing pay.
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