Employment Law

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Lauren McFarran, the National Labor Relations Board’s newest member, wants to dispel a misconception about how the controversial agency’s members work together.
Mining companies extracting gas from the Marcellus Shale formations in Pennsylvania and West Virginia violated the Fair Labor Standards Act by misclassifying employees and improperly paying overtime, according to the U.S. Department of Labor Wage and Hour Division.
Q. Please clarify the number of employees it takes to place a company under the obligation of Obama­­care. Our insurance carrier said it had been increased from 50 employees to 100.
Employers are still adjusting to the requirements under California’s Paid Sick Leave Law. This month, we offer even more information to help you comply.
The Pennsylvania Supreme Court has affirmed a Philadelphia jury’s huge verdict against retail giant Walmart. In 2006, the jury concluded the company violated state and federal wage laws when it forced employees to work through unpaid breaks and perform other duties while off the clock.
A flurry of bills signed at the end of the 2014 legislative session attempted to clarify liability in cases of joint employment.
Effective May 13, Philadelphia em­­ployers of 10 or more must provide one hour of paid leave for every 40 hours an employee works. Mayor Michael Nutter had twice vetoed similar legislation, fearing that the mandate would burden city employers still emerging from the recession.
Five foreign guest workers who wound up in Texas will share $14 million as victims of human trafficking. The decision offers lessons for any employer using guest workers.

When a government employee is arrested and charged with a crime related to her job, most public employers take some form of action—typically suspending the employee pending trial. If they are found guilty, they usually are terminated. Then the employee is entitled to “some sort of a hearing,” according to Supreme Court precedent. But what if criminal charges wind up being dropped?

An employee who tries to internally report alleged wrongdoing and is then fired can pursue internal remedies—and then go directly to court with her discharge and retaliation claims.
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