• LinkedIn
  • YouTube
  • Twitter
  • Facebook
  • Google+

Employment Law

Need employment law advice? Your employee’s hungry attorney knows the latest on employment at will, reasonable accommodations, and more.

Minimize employer liability, optimize labor relations, bullet-proof your employee handbook and update your knowledge of ADA guidelines with our employment law advice.

Pennsylvanians who knowingly hire illegal immigrants would lose their professional licenses under a bill being considered by the Pennsylvania Legislature. The “one-strike-and-you’re-out” law would yank licenses for first-offense violations.
Independent contractors aren’t eligible for unemployment compensation when their services are no longer needed. But just because you sign an agreement that says someone is an independent contractor doesn’t mean he really is.
When it comes to accommodating disabilities, the process is supposed to be interactive. That means both the employee and em­­ployer are supposed to discuss how best to accommodate a disability while meeting everyone’s needs. It’s important to keep excellent records showing your efforts at accommodation and em­­ployees’ responses—especially if they are less than cooperative.
If you’ve been worried that some of your workers may be incorrectly classified as independent contractors, but leery about opening a legal can of worms to fix potential problems, Uncle Sam is offering to cut you a break.
A federal judge has issued a temporary restraining order that prohibits a New Jersey hospital from forcing 12 nurses to participate in training or services related to abortions.
The 9th Circuit Court of Appeals has reversed a lower court decision that allowed a teacher to display banners with the word “God” in the classroom.
As soon as employers started equipping employees with email accounts and a list of company email addresses, things started getting complicated. You can punish employees for many email attack campaigns—as long as you first make sure the content doesn’t qualify as concerted or protected activity.
OSHA standards require that employees be able to open an exit route door from inside at all times, without keys, tools or special knowledge. Last month OSHA slapped a supermarket with more than $62,000 in fines for locking all five exit doors during the night shift.
Failing to effectively communicate with your employees isn’t just bad for business. It also can create legal trouble. Here are five of the most common errors that land employers in court. As you’ll see, communication lies at the heart of all of them.
A court hearing is scheduled for Dec. 19 on two business-backed lawsuits challenging the legality of the National Labor Relations Board's new requirement that U.S. employers display a new workplace poster describing employees’ union rights.