Employment Law

Need employment law advice? Your employee’s hungry attorney knows the latest on employment at will, reasonable accommodations, and more.

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Ordinarily, employers aren’t liable for workers’ injuries. Workers’ compensation insurance covers them. But if managers ignore safety guidelines that they know could prevent injuries, the employee can sue.
Willmar-based Jennie-O Turkey Stores faces 11 safety violations after a machine at its Barron, Wisc., slaughterhouse cut off an employee’s arm.

What should you do if an employee produces a health care professional’s diagnosis of stress, anxiety and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), along with a recommendation to reassign the employee? Do you accept that the employee is disabled and consider the reassignment as a reasonable accommodation?

Sometimes, a new job doesn’t work out—and the new kid on the block is the first to be let go in a downturn. That’s when his previous employer may be in for a surprise.
President Obama unveiled a $3.8 trillion proposed budget for fiscal year 2013 that, according to an analy­­sis by the Littler law firm, “signals that employers are facing an expanded enforcement and regulatory activity by the federal agencies.”
If a member of the National Guard or reserves is terminated, he or she can use the statement to show that military service was a motivating factor in that termination. That’s all that’s required under USERRA.
If you’re ever hauled into court to testify in an employment lawsuit against your organization, what you say—and how you say it—can sink your defense … or help you win. Prepare yourself for any lawsuit by asking yourself these 10 questions:
Q. I’m confused about what we can do to restrict gossiping over pay. We think it’s nobody’s business and our pay rates are based on a number of factors. Can’t we tell new employees that we consider compensation levels confidential?
In late January, the National Labor Relations Board released an “Operations Management Memo” that purports to offer additional guidance to employers and HR professionals concerned about employees’ use of social media. I can sum up the NLRB’s report in three words: What a mess.
President Obama’s push to raise the minimum wage from its current $7.25 per hour to $9.50 will likely fall on deaf ears in Congress this year.