Employment Law

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Q. While on unpaid leave, one of our employees applied for and was granted workers’ compensation. This person has not expressed any interest in returning to work. We think she may even be working somewhere else. Can we terminate her?

Q. We’ve heard in the news about the recently enacted Indiana right-to-work law. Could it have an effect on Illinois employers?

Congratulations! You just won a lawsuit filed by an employee who said you cheated him out of meal breaks. Now, can you get the employee to reimburse your legal fees? No, said the California Supreme Court.
Q. I heard that a new law allows criminal prosecution of employers that commit “wage theft.” Is it true?
OSHA has cited Steeleville-based Gilster-Mary Lee Corp. for safety violations after a dust ex­­plosion severely burned two employees.
A California appeals court has ruled that if an arbitration agreement doesn’t say whether class-action arbitration is allowed, then it isn’t.
Watch out if—like many Texas energy-industry employers—you also operate in Louisiana under the terms of a collective bargaining agreement that covers workplace safety. The 5th Circuit Court of Appeals just made life a little harder for you.
Ignoring California’s wage-and-hour rules is a big mistake—no matter where an employer is based. When foreign-owned corporations assign employees to work in Cali­for­nia, California’s employment rules apply.
Apparently, Piping Technology & Products (PTP) is a noisy place—so noisy that management failed to hear OSHA the first time it cited the company a year ago. Now it must pay OSHA fines totaling $118,000 after inspectors discovered conditions leading to one willful and nine serious health and safety violations.
Employees typically have just 300 days from the date an alleged discrimination occurred to file an EEOC ADA-related complaint. But the calendar grows longer if the employer conceals important facts.
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