Employment Law

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Five foreign guest workers who wound up in Texas will share $14 million as victims of human trafficking. The decision offers lessons for any employer using guest workers.

When a government employee is arrested and charged with a crime related to her job, most public employers take some form of action—typically suspending the employee pending trial. If they are found guilty, they usually are terminated. Then the employee is entitled to “some sort of a hearing,” according to Supreme Court precedent. But what if criminal charges wind up being dropped?

An employee who tries to internally report alleged wrongdoing and is then fired can pursue internal remedies—and then go directly to court with her discharge and retaliation claims.
On March 9, the Supreme Court ruled that the Department of Labor, which regulates the kind of employees who must receive overtime for working more than 40 hours per week, is free to flip-flop on its interpretation of the Fair Labor Standards Act without notice or an opportunity to comment on the proposed change.
The Senate voted March 4 to spike a new National Labor Relations Board (NLRB) rule that critics say promotes “quickie” union elections.
Q. A supervisor recently told me that some of my employees are planning to picket outside one of my businesses. Apparently, the picketers plan to block the building’s two exits with their vehicles in addition to picketing. Is this lawful?
In a recent interview, U.S. Department of Labor Wage and Hour Division Administrator David Weil hinted that the department may be “looking very actively at” guaranteeing employees predictable schedules under the Fair Labor Standards Act.
It was voted in by Oregon, Alaska and the District of Columbia with more states likely to adopt similar measures. What does this mean to consumers for federal income tax purposes?
The California state legislature made changes to both CalOSHA reporting requirements and fines for violations.
Sen. Lamar Alexander has introduced a bill that would expand the National Labor Relations Board from five members to six. Currently, the president appoints five board members with the “advice and consent of the Senate.” By law, two board members must be from the political party other than the president’s.
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