Employment Law

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The U.S. Supreme Court's decision to uphold the health care reform law means HR pros who handle health benefits are now under the gun to comply. A long list of milestones for implementing the ACA were established when the law was enacted in March 2010, and they remain in full force.

If your organization is required to keep track of employees’ injuries, take note of two OSHA interpretation letters.

The center of the HR universe is in Washington, D.C., this week, as the U.S. Supreme Court issues a key decision affecting hiring of undocumented workers and announces it will hear an important case concerning supervisor harassment in its next term. Oh yeah, and then there's that health care reform case, which should be decided Thursday.
The DOL recently gave the nod to national enforcement of regulations specifying that employees’ tips are their sole property, regardless of whether employers take the tip credit. This should serve as a timely reminder, since many teens and college students regularly earn tips during the summer.
There’s a good chance that what your employees actually do every day has little in common with what’s written in their job descriptions. That’s a problem. Inaccurate or in­­complete job descriptions can cause legal liability for ­­employers, especially if the EEOC or the DOL comes calling.
The federal Computer Fraud and Abuse Act (CFAA) doesn’t grant employers any legal recourse if an employee misuses information obtained from company computers, according to a recent Minnesota Federal District Court ruling.
USERRA is not a veteran’s preference law. It merely guarantees that service members can return to work no better or worse off than if they never left.
Here’s an important note in this rocky economy: Employers are free to change many of the terms and conditions of employment for at-will employees, including changing their compensation.
Charlotte-based Sandoval Con­­struc­­tion was forced to suspend work on a Radisson Hotel in New London, Conn., after the Connecticut De­­part­­ment of Labor charged the company with improperly classifying employees as independent contractors.
OSHA has cited Troy-based welding equipment manufacturer Hobart Brothers Co. with 55 safety violations totaling $174,600 in fines.
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