Employment Law

Need employment law advice? Your employee’s hungry attorney knows the latest on employment at will, reasonable accommodations, and more.

Minimize employer liability, optimize labor relations, bullet-proof your employee handbook and update your knowledge of ADA guidelines with our employment law advice.

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No matter the bad behavior of supervisors, always be ready to prove to a court that you execute your duties without any hint of bias. Doing so may save HR professionals like you from personal liability.
Asking to have a position re­­classified at a higher pay grade isn’t the same as requesting a promotion. If the request is turned down, the employee can’t sue for a denied promotion.
A federal judge has cited Alpha-based All-Feed Processing & Pack­­ag­­ing Inc. for contempt after it refused to allow OSHA inspectors full access to its Galva facility.
OSHA has cited Merlin Industries Inc. and Thermal Concepts Inc.—two Davie businesses owned by the same family and sharing the same address—for 17 safety violations, worth $59,100 in fines.
A former employee at Marine Corp Community Services, which provides recreational and social services at Cherry Point Marine Corps Air Station, has admitted she used a government credit card to embezzle approximately $74,000.
Q. Our evaluation process includes commitment to the community. We give all employees “points” for volunteering. The points become part of their numerical rating and could affect their rating (satisfactory or unsatisfactory) and raise potential. We don’t pay for volunteering time. Are we violating the law?
As part of negotiated settlements or court judgments, employers often sign off on “consent decrees” in which they agree to take (or stop) a certain action or pay damages. The Labor and Employment Law Program at Cornell University has unveiled an online repository of consent decrees, searchable by type of claim.
A recent court ruling in California confirms that the Americans with Disabilities Act does not protect the right of disabled employees to use medical marijuana, even if it’s prescribed by a doctor. Reason: The ADA specifically notes that a person with a legally protected “disability” does not include someone who is currently using illegal drugs.

Non-compete agreements place legal contractual reins on ex-employees who are setting up competing firms or going to work for competitors. Non-disclosure agreements can be separate from non-compete agreements and restrict the disclosure of trade secrets, marketing plans and confidential information.

Employers continue to get marched into court for violating service members’ re-employment rights under the Uniformed Services Employment and Reemploy­­ment Rights Act. Man­­agers on the front lines should be aware of the law and these common pitfalls:
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