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Employment Law

Need employment law advice? Your employee’s hungry attorney knows the latest on employment at will, reasonable accommodations, and more.

Minimize employer liability, optimize labor relations, bullet-proof your employee handbook and update your knowledge of ADA guidelines with our employment law advice.

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A Texas employer has “won” a case that shows why going without ­workers’ compensation insurance can be expensive even in the best of circumstances. It persuaded a Texas appeals court that an accident—not negligence—caused a nurse’s injury, but only after spending thousands of dollars to defend itself.

After years of employer uncertainty, the California Supreme Court has finally resolved what em­­ployers must do to provide meal and rest breaks. They must make sure employees are relieved of all duties during the breaks. However, they do not have to ensure that no work is performed during breaks.

The Texas Supreme Court has handed an important victory to Texas employers eager to avoid jury trials for employment disputes: It ruled that, as long as the employees are at-will workers, threatening to fire them for refusing to give up the right to a jury trial does not invalidate the agreement.
Manhattan celebrity chef Mario Batali has agreed to a $5.25 million settlement with waiters, bartenders, busboys and other floor staff at several of his restaurants.
Don’t worry that releases you ask employees to sign in exchange for severance pay aren’t broad enough to cover claims under USERRA or the New York Military Law. As long as the release is clear and unequivocal about what’s being waived, it doesn’t have to specifically reference the laws.
Q. We’ve received differing information on exactly what notices we’re legally supposed to post in our office. Where can I find a reliable listing?

Q. We have a fleet of company cars. If an employee is at fault in an accident, is it legal for us to require reimbursement for the $500 deductible by reducing his pay over a period of three or four pay cycles?

A state appeals court has reversed a lower court ruling and held that the city of Yonkers’ refusal to reimburse new employees for their statutorily required Tier V retirement plan contributions was not subject to arbitration. Our firm—Bond, Schoeneck & King—represented the city of Yonkers in the litigation.

Q. Has the penalty for employer violations of the Illinois Equal Pay Act recently increased?
Charlotte-based Sandoval Con­­struc­­tion was forced to suspend work on a Radisson Hotel in New London, Conn., after the Connecticut De­­part­­ment of Labor charged the company with improperly classifying employees as independent contractors.
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