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Employment Law

Need employment law advice? Your employee’s hungry attorney knows the latest on employment at will, reasonable accommodations, and more.

Minimize employer liability, optimize labor relations, bullet-proof your employee handbook and update your knowledge of ADA guidelines with our employment law advice.

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If your organization is required to keep track of employees’ injuries, take note of two OSHA interpretation letters.

The center of the HR universe is in Washington, D.C., this week, as the U.S. Supreme Court issues a key decision affecting hiring of undocumented workers and announces it will hear an important case concerning supervisor harassment in its next term. Oh yeah, and then there's that health care reform case, which should be decided Thursday.
The DOL recently gave the nod to national enforcement of regulations specifying that employees’ tips are their sole property, regardless of whether employers take the tip credit. This should serve as a timely reminder, since many teens and college students regularly earn tips during the summer.
There’s a good chance that what your employees actually do every day has little in common with what’s written in their job descriptions. That’s a problem. Inaccurate or in­­complete job descriptions can cause legal liability for ­­employers, especially if the EEOC or the DOL comes calling.
The federal Computer Fraud and Abuse Act (CFAA) doesn’t grant employers any legal recourse if an employee misuses information obtained from company computers, according to a recent Minnesota Federal District Court ruling.
USERRA is not a veteran’s preference law. It merely guarantees that service members can return to work no better or worse off than if they never left.
Here’s an important note in this rocky economy: Employers are free to change many of the terms and conditions of employment for at-will employees, including changing their compensation.
Q. I run a nonunion construction contracting company. We recently received a letter from a union stating that they believe we are paying substandard wages and benefits. The letter asked us to provide any information we might have to show that they are wrong and that we are paying area standard compensation to our people. Does the union have a right to this information?
Some employees make a hobby out of suing employers. The next time you face a serial litigant, ask your attorney to try to persuade the court to ban further filings. More and more courts are willing to agree.
A Texas employer has “won” a case that shows why going without ­workers’ compensation insurance can be expensive even in the best of circumstances. It persuaded a Texas appeals court that an accident—not negligence—caused a nurse’s injury, but only after spending thousands of dollars to defend itself.
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