Employment Law

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Good news for employers that want to settle employment-related disputes through arbitration instead of risking a jury trial. The Court of Appeal of California has upheld an arbitration agreement that was presented to all employees when they were hired.
A North Carolina postal worker could wind up working in a prison mail room after pleading guilty to workers’ compensation fraud. Her problems began when former co-workers spotted her on the television game show “Wheel of Fortune.”
In a significant win for organized labor, the Supreme Court of California has ruled that a union is entitled to the home addresses and telephone numbers of employees who aren’t union members.
Good news for employers worried about their public image: If you provide carpool transportation for your employees and want to control their behavior while using that transportation, you can.
Q. We would like to require employees to pay for their own uniforms. Is this legal? If not, we would like to require employees to purchase uniforms. Then we would reimburse them. Is that OK, or must we purchase the uniforms and provide them to the employees?
Under the newly enacted Texas Uniform Trade Secrets Act, you will have more recourse when someone misappropriates your intellectual property. Starting Sept. 1, this new statute provides companies with greater protection for their trade secrets and expands the available legal remedies to address actual and anticipated harm.
Q. Our data entry employee has been diagnosed with carpal tunnel syndrome in both hands. She has not submitted a workers’ comp claim but has advised us of her diagnosis. Are we required to file the claim even if she hasn’t?
Get ready, New York ­employers. New developments will affect how and how much you pay your employees. The state minimum wage will soon increase and the NYSDOL has proposed new regulations on wage deductions.
Gov. Rick Perry has signed legislation providing important protections for employers facing negligent hiring or supervision claims. The new law also makes it more attractive for ­employers to hire applicants with criminal records.
Q. An employee of ours accused a co-worker of threatening him with physical harm. When we confronted the accused employee, he attributed the behavior to his psychological disorder and to a recent change in his prescription. We would like to verify the em­­ployee’s claims. Are we permitted to ask the em­­ployee for medical certification of his disability and a doctor’s statement regarding his prescribed medications?