Employment Law

Need employment law advice? Your employee’s hungry attorney knows the latest on employment at will, reasonable accommodations, and more.

Minimize employer liability, optimize labor relations, bullet-proof your employee handbook and update your knowledge of ADA guidelines with our employment law advice.

Page 60 of 505« First...102030596061708090...Last »
Employees typically have just 300 days from the date an alleged discrimination occurred to file an EEOC ADA-related complaint. But the calendar grows longer if the employer conceals important facts.

When James Telb was sheriff of Lucas County, he faced federal charges relating to an inmate’s death in the county jail. He was acquitted in December 2010, but claims the process left him saddled with $200,000 in legal fees. Now he is suing the county to recover the money.

In April, the Cali­­for­­nia Supreme Court finally issued its opinion in Brinker v. Superior Court. In a major victory for California employers, the court issued clear rules on how and when employee meal and rest periods must be provided.
In a case that tested the limits of an employer’s attendance policy, a nurse who had requested an accommodation that would have excused her from her employer’s five un­­planned absences limit has lost her appeal and won’t have her case reinstated. The 9th Circuit Court of Appeals upheld the dismissal of the nurse’s lawsuit.
A state Court of Appeals has ruled that Cal/OSHA does not have to produce 2,200 files covering several years in a lawsuit over enforcement of California’s regulations designed to safeguard workers from work-related heat illness.
The $153 billion California State Teachers’ Retirement System, which holds more than 5.3 million shares of Walmart stock, has sued the retail giant following allegations in April that executives in its Mexican division offered millions of dollars to Mexican officials in exchange for expediting building permits.

The North Carolina Retaliatory Employment Discrimination Act outlaws discharging em­­ployees for filing workers’ compensation claims. It’s a protected activity. Equally illegal: Jumping the gun by firing employees before they ­actually fill out the workers’ compensation paperwork.

On April 26, Gov. Jerry Brown signed a bill denying state construction funds to cities that have ordinances that restrict the use of project labor agreements (PLAs).

Q. While on unpaid leave, one of our employees applied for and was granted workers’ compensation. This person has not expressed any interest in returning to work. We think she may even be working somewhere else. Can we terminate her?

Summertime is when employers can capitalize on an influx of eager school-age workers looking for seasonal jobs. Summer jobs can be great for both young workers and employers, but you should be mindful of federal and state child labor laws.
Page 60 of 505« First...102030596061708090...Last »