Employment Law

Need employment law advice? Your employee’s hungry attorney knows the latest on employment at will, reasonable accommodations, and more.

Minimize employer liability, optimize labor relations, bullet-proof your employee handbook and update your knowledge of ADA guidelines with our employment law advice.

Page 6 of 539« First...567...102030...Last »
If you use independent contractors to perform design work, make sure your contractor agreement transfers copyrights and other intellectual property rights to you.
Generally, employees who complain to their employer that they aren’t being properly paid or classified under the Fair Labor Standards Act are protected from retaliation for those complaints. But what about a manager?
In states where recreational and medical marijuana is legal, 41% of employers have a zero-tolerance policy for anyone who tests positive.
The U.S. Department of Homeland Security has published new proposed regulations designed to make it easier for highly skilled immigrants who hold work visas to remain in the country if their work circumstances change.

Here’s a bit of good news that may prevent a big jury verdict: An employment-related whistleblower claim must be heard and decided by a judge, not a jury.

An attorney who once worked for Valley Forge, Pa.-based investment firm Vanguard claims the company charges its affiliates artificially low management fees, which illegally reduces its own tax burden.
You may have heard that employees have new opportunities to sue their employers based on local laws that expand employment protections and prohibit forms of discrimination that state or federal laws don’t include. Sometimes, that’s true. Fortunately, though, these new laws and their regulations may trip up employees and give you an opportunity to push for the case to be dismissed, as this recent case shows.
Government employees in Texas are protected from retaliation for blowing the whistle on a co-worker, supervisor or the agency where they work.

A federal magistrate has ordered notifications sent to a large group of employees inviting them to join in a Fair Labor Standards Act lawsuit.

A federal court has refused to expand common law workplace protection for victims of domestic abuse.