Employment Law

Need employment law advice? Your employee’s hungry attorney knows the latest on employment at will, reasonable accommodations, and more.

Minimize employer liability, optimize labor relations, bullet-proof your employee handbook and update your knowledge of ADA guidelines with our employment law advice.

Would you think less highly of male applicants because they took leave under the Family and Medical Leave Act (FMLA)? Your first answer may be "No," but a new study suggests ...
Issue: In this election year, politics will become a hot topic around the water cooler.
Risk: Retaliating against employees for their off-site political activities or comments can run you into ...
Issue: Retaliation complaints by employees doubled in the past decade.
Risk: Even if you escape liability on an initial employment lawsuit, you could be smacked with a secondary retaliation charge. ...
Issue: How to avoid the often-overlooked liabilities of using interns in your workplace. Risk: Courts view interns the same as employees, as "agents" of your organization. Plus, you face extra ...

If your business pays nonemployees for services, you're responsible for providing that information to the IRS each year.
The timing is critical, and the clock is running down.

Avoid the temptation to lure star applicants by painting an overly rosy financial picture about your company or making misleading statements about job security.

If you're renewing your business insurance or changing carriers soon, do some smart, advance planning to earn a good inspection rating. Don't fear such an inspection; it can reduce your premiums 5 to 10 percent.

The federal government is cranking up its workplace safety inspections, especially targeting repeat offenders and companies with unusually high reports of workplace injuries and illnesses.

As the Internet flourishes, scores of Internet profiteers and disgruntled ex-employees are rushing to claim Web site addresses ("domain names") of companies and then turning around and attempting to sell the addresses back to the companies.

A recent case reminds employers that it's illegal to retaliate against workers who participate in any type of workplace investigation.