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Employment Law

Need employment law advice? Your employee’s hungry attorney knows the latest on employment at will, reasonable accommodations, and more.

Minimize employer liability, optimize labor relations, bullet-proof your employee handbook and update your knowledge of ADA guidelines with our employment law advice.

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Q. We sometimes require our hourly employees to commute from the office to a two-day meeting that includes company-sponsored social activities and an overnight stay. They then return to the office after meetings on the second day. How do we pay them for this time?
In a union workplace, the collective bargaining agreement outlines rights for both employees and the employer. It also defines the powers an arbitrator may have if called on to interpret the contract. If the arbitrator goes too far, a court can reverse his or her decision.
A federal court has refused to open up yet another avenue for employees who want to directly sue their em­­ployers.
OSHA has cited Boomerang Rubber Inc. with 31 health and safety violations after a worker’s arm was amputated while he was performing maintenance on a rubber processing machine at a truck mat and mud flap manufacturing plant in Botkins.
No matter the bad behavior of supervisors, always be ready to prove to a court that you execute your duties without any hint of bias. Doing so may save HR professionals like you from personal liability.
Asking to have a position re­­classified at a higher pay grade isn’t the same as requesting a promotion. If the request is turned down, the employee can’t sue for a denied promotion.
A federal judge has cited Alpha-based All-Feed Processing & Pack­­ag­­ing Inc. for contempt after it refused to allow OSHA inspectors full access to its Galva facility.
OSHA has cited Merlin Industries Inc. and Thermal Concepts Inc.—two Davie businesses owned by the same family and sharing the same address—for 17 safety violations, worth $59,100 in fines.
A former employee at Marine Corp Community Services, which provides recreational and social services at Cherry Point Marine Corps Air Station, has admitted she used a government credit card to embezzle approximately $74,000.

When employees represent themselves in court, their court documents are often woefully short on specifics. More courts are getting aggressive, quickly tossing out these pro se cases. That’s good news for employers.

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