• LinkedIn
  • YouTube
  • Twitter
  • Facebook
  • Google+

Employment Law

Need employment law advice? Your employee’s hungry attorney knows the latest on employment at will, reasonable accommodations, and more.

Minimize employer liability, optimize labor relations, bullet-proof your employee handbook and update your knowledge of ADA guidelines with our employment law advice.

Page 49 of 498« First...102030484950607080...Last »
Q. We have heard that employers are increasingly screening applicants online, including by going to their Facebook pages. Can we require an applicant who has a private Facebook page to give us the password to that page?
A white Chicago teacher was suspended for five days after he used the N-word in what he described as a “teachable moment.” The teacher used the epithet after he caught students passing a note containing rap lyrics that included the word.
Q. Can we legally prohibit female workers from breastfeeding at work?
The Tribune Co., the U.S. Department of Labor and Greatbanc Trust Co. have agreed to restore $32 million to the media giant’s employee stock ownership plan.
Think twice before shutting down one of several related businesses just to stop the spread of pro-union sentiment. It’s likely to prompt a lawsuit, and a court may well take organized labor’s side.

The ADA requires employers to work with employees who need reasonable accommodations. Show you did so in good faith by documenting the process. That means tracking email exchanges, taking notes during meetings and generally responding as quickly as possible. Be sure to note the employee’s actions, too.

Under the state’s workers’ compensation law, Pennsylvania employees have 120 days to report workplace injuries to their employers. But em­­ployers are free to require more immediate reports. Firing the employee for breaking a timely accident reporting rule doesn’t violate the law.

Sometimes, employers settle an employee lawsuit and expect that to be the end of the matter. But unless the settlement includes an agreement not to apply for any new job openings, the former employee may do just that. And if he’s not hired, he may allege retaliation for prior litigation.

Disabled employees who need reasonable accommodations are entitled to what the ADA calls the interactive reasonable accommo­­dations process. What exactly that means varies by the individual and may change over time. Employers that consider the interactive process as a one-time thing may end up in court.

Q. My company uses a time clock to track the hours of nonexempt employees. When we determine the wages to be paid to employees, can we round up or down to the nearest five-minute increment?
Page 49 of 498« First...102030484950607080...Last »