Employment Law

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Michigan’s wage payment law seems like it should be rather simple, but it’s perhaps the most complicated employment law in the state. Full of traps for the unwary, the law can spell big trouble for even innocent mistakes. The law covers all Michigan private employers, even those with only one employee ...

Georgia’s minimum wage of $5.15 per hour currently matches the federal minimum wage (which Congress voted to increase to $5.85 per hour effective July 24, 2007). However, the Georgia Minimum Wage Law differs in some key aspects from the federal minimum under the Fair Labor Standards Act ...

The Pennsylvania Seasonal Farm Labor Act regulates the working conditions of migrant farm workers. The act establishes minimum wages and labor hours for seasonal farm workers ...

 As of Jan. 1, 2007, the minimum wage in New York state is $7.15. The Division of Labor Standards in the state Department of Labor administers the law ...

The child labor rules in California differ from those of other states, largely because of the motion picture industry. State laws governing child labor start at birth and regulate everything from the length of the workday to the amount of light a child can be exposed to ...

Illinois employees have enhanced leave options in addition to their rights under the federal FMLA. Employers with 50 or more employees are subject to Illinois’ School Visitation Rights Act, the Victims’ Economic Security and Safety Act and the Employee Blood Donation Leave Act. Also, employers with at least 15 employees must comply with the Illinois Family Military Leave Act ...

Michigan’s child labor law prohibits employers from hiring minors under age 16 in “an occupation that is hazardous or injurious to the minor’s health or personal well-being.” You may hire minors 14 years old provided you obtain permission from their school ...

The Georgia workers’ compensation system protects employees who are injured on the job by replacing lost wages while they recover. The State Board of Workers’ Compensation administers the law, which the Georgia legislature modified in 2006 ...

Under Georgia’s child labor law, minors ages 14 to 17 must obtain employment certificates from their school or county school superintendent in order to work. (The law prohibits employers from hiring children under age 14.) ...

The Pennsylvania Child Labor Act restricts employers’ ability to hire minors. Children ages 12 to 14 can work as golf caddies (within certain restrictions), and children ages 14 to 16 can work during nonschool hours. Youth under age 18 may not work more than six consecutive days ...