Employment Law

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Issue: Severance agreements that deny severance payments to employees fired "for cause."
Risk: Failing to clarify "for cause" could result in having to pay severance to people fired for blatant ...
To file a legal workplace discrimination claim with the EEOC, employees must show that the alleged discrimination occurred within a certain time frame or filing "threshold." Now, the EEOC has revised ...
The EEOC just published a Q&A document explaining when cancer is a qualified disability under the ADA and how you should accommodate employees with cancer. Reasonable accommodations may include intermittent leave, ...
A study by the Society for Human Resource Management says only 56 percent of employers now offer flex schedules, down from 65 percent in 2002. Why the change? Experts say ...
You may know that the ADA entitles disabled people to reasonable accommodations to allow them to perform their job's essential functions. But what about employees who have minor medical ailments that ...
Using unstructured, "tell me about yourself" questions during job interviews not only opens you to discrimination claims, it often results in poor hires, says Mindy Chapman, national director of training for ...
THE LAW. The Age Discrimination in Employment Act (ADEA) makes it illegal to discriminate in the work-place against people over age 40 on the basis of their age. The law ...
If your organization is hit with an employee lawsuit, consider having your attorney check for a bankruptcy filing by the employee who sues you. If the lawsuit isn't listed as an asset with ...
When an employee makes noise about discrimination, it's natural to become defensive. It hurts to be accused of
breaking the law, especially if it isn't true. But don't let a ...
The federal Uniform Services Employment and Reemployment Rights Act (USERRA) says that if an employee's military-related absences last less than five years, you must reinstate the employee to his or her ...