Employment Law

Need employment law advice? Your employee’s hungry attorney knows the latest on employment at will, reasonable accommodations, and more.

Minimize employer liability, optimize labor relations, bullet-proof your employee handbook and update your knowledge of ADA guidelines with our employment law advice.

Issue: Must you include a position's most obvious requirements, such as working at the job site, in employees' job descriptions? Risk: Misunderstandings can spark lawsuits from employees who are eligible ...
Caution your hiring managers to avoid making, or even hinting at, guarantees to prospective employees about long-term job commitments. "Talking up" permanence to lure applicants could crush your ability to fire ...
Don't ask employees to sign away their rights, as part of a settlement agreement or lawsuit waiver, to file a discrimination claim with the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commis-sion (EEOC) or ...
You may be surprised to discover that the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) may protect workers who are alcoholics, even if they currently drink. To earn ADA protection, an alcoholic's addiction ...
Noncompete agreements are easier signed than enforced. So your noncompete restrictions must give the person a "reasonable opportunity" to pursue a livelihood in his or her chosen field.
What's considered ...
You know what they say about good intentions. As the following case shows, if your anti-harassment efforts are seen as an attempt to squash a union-organizing bid, you could be slapped ...
About 13,000 U.S. employers recently received letters alerting them that their companies' injury and illness rates are "significantly higher" than national averages. They were warned to shape up. The letters don't ...
THE LAW. Regular attendance is obviously a key job function for most of your employees. But despite your freedom to set and enforce attendance rules, you also face key legal ...
Issue: Failing to train employees on discrimination and harassment can prove a costly mistake, but so is training them the wrong way. Benefit: Effective and ongoing training signals your "good-faith" ...

The numbers are deceiving: IRS gum-shoes audited only 0.57 percent of individual tax returns in fiscal year 2002. The rate isn't much higher (only 1.45 percent) for Schedule C filers with incomes above $100,000.