Employment Law

Need employment law advice? Your employee’s hungry attorney knows the latest on employment at will, reasonable accommodations, and more.

Minimize employer liability, optimize labor relations, bullet-proof your employee handbook and update your knowledge of ADA guidelines with our employment law advice.

Q. Our company employs fewer than 50 people, so we don't have to comply with FMLA. Do we need to mention that fact in our employee handbook? —G.R., Michigan

Q. One of our employees has been out on disability leave for almost 16 months. He says he wants to return to work, but only if we give him a supervisory position without a lot of strenuous activity. We have no such position available. We've offered him other positions, but he's refused them all. Can we legally terminate him? —L.B., North Carolina

Pennsylvania law makes it easy to enforce noncompete contracts. But trying to make a business-interference claim against an ex-employee is almost a lost cause ...

Here's more incentive to make correct employment decisions the first time around: A recent court ruling makes clear that employees can still sue under Title VII even if your organization quickly reverses a decision ...

If you have a progressive-discipline policy in your employee handbook, it’s legally wise to follow it carefully with all employees. If you deviate from it and fire a worker quickly, be prepared to provide a good reason ...

Frivolous lawsuits will forever be a thorn in the side of HR. But, according to a new report, employees are becoming more successful in job discrimination complaints filed with the EEOC ...

Most employee lawsuits stem from employees' perceptions that they got a raw deal. So before you discipline an employee in writing, ask yourself these questions ...

Texas law makes it illegal to fire an employee in retaliation for filing a workers' compensation claim. But that doesn't mean employees are untouchable just because they're out on workers' comp. You can legally discharge injured workers under a reasonable absence-control policy that applies to all employees, regardless of how they were injured or became ill ...

You may think it's obvious, but it has taken a federal appeals court to make clear that employees have no federal right to competent employment-law counsel, as offered in criminal cases. Employees who pick incompetent attorneys don't get a second chance to sue. That's good news for employers, who won't have to face the same lawsuit again if an employee's less-than-stellar lawyer bumbles the case ...

Image is everything, as the saying goes. But be extra careful that your pursuit of a certain work-force image doesn’t result in the weeding out of legally protected employees (females, minorities, older workers, etc.) ...