Employment Law

Need employment law advice? Your employee’s hungry attorney knows the latest on employment at will, reasonable accommodations, and more.

Minimize employer liability, optimize labor relations, bullet-proof your employee handbook and update your knowledge of ADA guidelines with our employment law advice.

Try this one: A New York City school psychologist who suffered from asthma and migraines approached an incoming principal about continuing his accommodations, which included an air-conditioned office. The principal allegedly replied, “If you require an accommodation, you should get yourself a job that doesn’t require an accommodation” ...

Q. One of our employees, who has diabetes, is on the road a lot tending to patients in their homes. We’ve heard that she is having trouble seeing patient charts and difficulty pricking patients’ fingers for tests. What should we do? —M.J., New Jersey

Q. We've had a disabled worker on staff for five years. He's consistently absent or tardy and has trouble working with others and keeping up his job duties. We adjusted his hours, but his poor work forced us to reassign some of his duties and even hire another person to help carry the load. What can we do? —F.F., Texas

Federal law says you must grant employees "reasonable accommodations" for their religious beliefs and practices. But that doesn't mean that any employees who are told they must work on their Sabbath have an automatic lawsuit ...

Your company has employment practices liability insurance (EPLI), so it's covered in case of any employee lawsuit, right? Not so fast. The fine print in an EPLI policy can turn an apparently strong lawsuit shield into a worthless piece of paper ...

Until recently, companies that sold products and services over the Web didn’t feel that the ADA applied to them, meaning they weren’t required to make their sites accessible to visually impaired or disabled people. But a lawsuit against Target stores has Web retailers rethinking that assumption ...

An otherwise good employee is acting out of character, and you think she needs help. Do you insist she contact the employee assistance program (EAP), and send her home? ...

Q. Is there a law or reasonable standard regarding how many weeks maternity leave should be? And should we make that a written policy in our employee handbook? Even with FMLA, to which our employees are entitled, we thought maternity leave was either six or eight weeks, depending on type of delivery. —J.F., Pennsylvania

Q. Is it legal to require management employees to give us a longer resignation period than other employees? —M.L., Missouri

Q. Are there any questions we cannot or should not ask a reference when screening applicants? —B.B., Louisiana