Employment Law

Need employment law advice? Your employee’s hungry attorney knows the latest on employment at will, reasonable accommodations, and more.

Minimize employer liability, optimize labor relations, bullet-proof your employee handbook and update your knowledge of ADA guidelines with our employment law advice.

HR Law 101: Make sure your job advertisements are based on accurate, up-to-date job descriptions and comply with anti-discrimination laws. Don’t use phrases like “perfect for college students” or “ideal for working mothers” …

HR Law 101: Make it your policy never to hire a candidate without a reference/background check. Your organization could be held liable for “negligent hiring” or “failure to warn” should the employee turn violent on the job. If the employee’s past history would have revealed a problem but you didn’t spot it because you didn’t check, the courts will say you “should have known.” Your firm not only might have to pay damages but also would suffer a loss of reputation ...    
 

 

Perhaps the last thing you want to think about is hiring an attorney. But someday you will probably have to work with attorneys on contracts or even — perish the thought — lawsuits aimed at your organization. The good news is you can take some steps to contain the cost of using outside lawyers. Here are the 10 best ways to trim your legal expenses.

HR Law 101: The Americans with Disabilities Act prohibits discrimination against qualified applicants on the basis of a physical or mental disability. The law allows you to ask about an applicant's ability to perform a job's essential functions but not about a specific disability ...

HR Law 101: If you fail to do background checks on applicants for certain positions, you could make yourself vulnerable to a negligent-hiring lawsuit by any worker or customer who’s been hurt by a violent employee. You should check applicants’ backgrounds especially for positions such as day care worker, security guard and sales representative ...

White Paper published by The HR Specialist ______________________ When it comes to making job offers, your hiring managers could be inadvertently locking your organization into an employment contract with the new hire. It’s a common mistake, and only a few misplaced words can sink you. Employers who use written job-offer letters run the highest risk […]

Local governments in Florida can, and sometimes do, legislate what employers can and can’t do within their jurisdictions. For example, since the Florida Civil Rights Act contains no protections against discrimination based on sexual preference, some local governments have adopted ordinances to address the issue ...

Under California’s Fair Employment and Housing Act (FEHA), it’s unlawful to subject people to differential treatment based on race, religious creed, color, national origin, ancestry, physical or mental disability, medical condition, marital status, sex, age or sexual orientation ...

Under Michigan’s Elliott-Larsen Civil Rights Act (ELCRA), it’s illegal to subject people to differential treatment based on religion, race, color, national origin, age, sex, height, weight, familial status or marital status ...