Employment Law

Need employment law advice? Your employee’s hungry attorney knows the latest on employment at will, reasonable accommodations, and more.

Minimize employer liability, optimize labor relations, bullet-proof your employee handbook and update your knowledge of ADA guidelines with our employment law advice.

When the threat of an employee lawsuit looms, most employers are advised to take a tough stance, fight the charges and never admit guilt. But some attorneys now advocate that an often-overlooked option of simply saying "I'm sorry" in certain situations may actually soothe feelings and even defuse legal action ...

In many states, vocational programs pair disabled residents with “job coaches,” who help them find appropriate work and adapt to those jobs. Since the ADA also requires employers to make reasonable accommodations during the hiring process, make sure job coaches are welcome in your interviews ...

Morgan Stanley won the latest round in its high-profile battle with IT employee Arthur Riel, who was fired for sharing e-mails that revealed questionable management practices at the firm ...

Federal law says you must grant employees "reasonable accommodations" for their religious beliefs and practices. But that doesn't mean that any employees who are told they must work on their Sabbath have an automatic lawsuit ...

Your company has employment practices liability insurance (EPLI), so it's covered in case of any employee lawsuit, right? Not so fast. The fine print in an EPLI policy can turn an apparently strong lawsuit shield into a worthless piece of paper ...

Just because an employee urges you to investigate alleged discrimination, don’t assume you have to treat that person with kid gloves. If it turns out that the complainer was actually the one causing the problems, you can—and should—take action ...

It’s crucial to keep meticulous FMLA records, from requests to approvals to return-to-work discussions. If you fail to create a solid paper trail, courts will resolve any questions in the employee’s favor ...

Warning: If you terminate employees who take more than 12 weeks off in a given period, you may be violating the FMLA even if you allow employees their full FMLA allotment of 12 weeks unpaid leave ...

Q. We're a surveying company and often use temporary workers on big projects. We recently rejected a candidate sent by the temp agency. Now, the candidate is threatening to sue, saying we discriminated against her because of her accent. Can she sue us even though she was employed by the temp agency, not by us? —M.L., Maryland

Q. Our company employs fewer than 50 people, so we don't have to comply with FMLA. Do we need to mention that fact in our employee handbook? —G.R., Michigan