Employment Law

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The EEOC and Jameson Memorial Hospital settled a federal lawsuit that was originally filed last February. The New Castle hospital will pay $50,000 to an African-American radiology technician who claimed the hospital denied him training opportunities because of his race ...

In recent years, unions have pushed to organize well-compensated professionals. In response, employers have argued that those professionals form part of the management team and, therefore, are not eligible for union representation. Last month, the employers' view won out ...

Employees who work for religious organizations, such as church schools, can’t sue for retaliation under Florida’s Private-Sector Whistleblower Act, even if the conduct they report is clearly illegal ...

Q. A former employee recently filed a complaint against my company with the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) alleging race discrimination. As part of its investigation, the agency will be coming to our offices to interview employees. Do I have to make these employees available? Can I sit in on the employee interviews? —D.N., Colorado

For Texas employers, the long-range forecast shows an unstable union atmosphere over the next several years, with pressure building from health care costs, outsourcing and immigration reform. As the united front of the AFL-CIO and the new Change to Win union blow through the state, damage may be significant ...

The Uniformed Services Employment and Reemployment Rights Act (USERRA) protects the rights of soldiers and reservists who are called to active duty or training and want to return to their jobs once their service is over. But these rights aren't without limits ...

If you have a progressive-discipline policy in your employee handbook, it’s legally wise to follow it carefully with all employees. If you deviate from it and fire a worker quickly, be prepared to provide a good reason ...

Frivolous lawsuits will forever be a thorn in the side of HR. But, according to a new report, employees are becoming more successful in job discrimination complaints filed with the EEOC ...

As an employer, you can't always wait on a background check before offering a job, so you have to rely on applicants' oral and written statements to make the offer. But when the background check comes back to reveal that the person lied, you have the absolute right to terminate that individual for dishonesty ...

The federal job anti-discrimination law (Title VII of the Civil Rights Act) prohibits two types of discrimination: disparate treatment and disparate impact. Because automated tests, such as résumé-screening programs, are blind to applicants' race, religion, gender and national origin, they likely can't create a disparate-treatment case. However, such programs can still have a disparate impact on minorities ...