Employment Law

Need employment law advice? Your employee’s hungry attorney knows the latest on employment at will, reasonable accommodations, and more.

Minimize employer liability, optimize labor relations, bullet-proof your employee handbook and update your knowledge of ADA guidelines with our employment law advice.

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According to a National Retail Federation survey, retail employers caught 80,366 employees stealing in 2014, a figure representing one out of every 38 employees.
One remedy for discrimination is reinstatement. However, employers should be prepared to argue against reinstatement if there are reasons unrelated to a lawsuit that it is not a workable option. Here’s how one employer did that.
In a significant defeat for small business, the 5th Circuit Court of Appeals on June 10 upheld the National Labor Relations Board’s controversial “ambush election” rule that critics say unfairly makes it easier for unions to organize.
Proper handling can leave room for a good worker to return to top form, but it’s important to proceed carefully, deliberately, and without favoritism.

When faced with an employee who may have a physical or mental disability, a manager's legal antenna should go up right away. The ADA requires employers to engage in an interactive dialog with employees to determine whether a disability can be accommodated. Do it wrong, and you're probably looking at a lawsuit. Here's how to handle the conversation.

The National Labor Relations Board’s new joint employer standard violates the National Labor Relations Act, according to opening briefs filed by Browning-Ferris Industries in a closely watched lawsuit that seeks to overturn a major NLRB decision.
Don’t be so sure that a lawsuit filed by a disgruntled former employee without a lawyer’s help won’t go anywhere.

If you currently engage the services of an advisor to help employees understand your side on union organizing and collective bargaining issues, get in touch with him or her and your attorney right away!

Employees can’t be held responsible for work not performed while they are out on FMLA medical leave. But that doesn’t mean employers are powerless to discipline an employee for poor performance that’s not related to the medical leave.
Federal employees have just 45 days after a discriminatory act or decision to file an internal complaint.
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