Employment Law — Business Management Daily: Free Reports on Human Resources, Employment Law, Office Management, Office Communication, Office Technology and Small Business Tax Business Management Daily — Business Management Daily: Free Reports on Human Resources, Employment Law, Office Management, Office Communication, Office Technology and Small Business Tax Page 30
  • LinkedIn
  • YouTube
  • Twitter
  • Facebook
  • Google+

Employment Law

Need employment law advice? Your employee’s hungry attorney knows the latest on employment at will, reasonable accommodations, and more.

Minimize employer liability, optimize labor relations, bullet-proof your employee handbook and update your knowledge of ADA guidelines with our employment law advice.

Page 30 of 572« First...1020...293031...405060...Last »
As health insurance policies begin to include more coverage for sex reassignment surgery and treatment, some employees are suing for past noncoverage. But, unless it was the employee who was denied coverage, the court won’t allow the suit.
National home-improvement chain Lowe's has settled charges it violated the ADA when it terminated employees after they exhausted the amount of leave the company permitted.
California employers who want to bind their workers to arbitration have to jump through a number of hoops. For one thing, you need to produce an agreement signed by the employee.
An employee facing the prospect of being demoted, transferred or having to take on new duties may consider retiring instead.
Retail giant Target could face a class-action lawsuit in federal court in New York.
A federal appeals court ruled late last month that arbitration agreements prohibiting class-action lawsuits violate the National Labor Relations Act.
Some workers are thin-skinned and seem to think that little annoyances can add up to a discrimination or retaliation lawsuit. Fortunately, that’s not true.
Carefully document each and every disciplinary action at the time it occurs, complete with details on who said what and when it happened.
The U.S. Supreme Court ruled on May 23 that the clock starts ticking on constructive discharge cases on the day the employee announces plans to resign, not the day an employer’s allegedly intolerable act occurred.
A recent court decision is good news for employers of commissioned, exempt salespeople that also imply in their advertising that the salespeople don’t work on commission.
Page 30 of 572« First...1020...293031...405060...Last »