Employment Law

Need employment law advice? Your employee’s hungry attorney knows the latest on employment at will, reasonable accommodations, and more.

Minimize employer liability, optimize labor relations, bullet-proof your employee handbook and update your knowledge of ADA guidelines with our employment law advice.

Page 21 of 541« First...10...202122...304050...Last »
Sharing-economy employers, take note: Your innovative business model doesn’t mesh well with traditional interpretations of employment law. The latest evidence: The California Labor Commissioner’s determination that an Uber driver is an employee, not an independent contractor.
Sen. Al Franken has co-sponsored a bill with Rep. Hank Johnson (D-Ga.) that would limit what issues employers could force employees to arbitrate.
A California Court of Appeal has upheld an arbitration agreement written in English and signed by employees with limited language ability.
For want of a thumbtack, the Fair Labor Standards Act’s statute of limitations didn’t run. In a case involving a domestic worker’s pay dispute but equally applicable to any employment situation, a federal appeals court ruled that failing to display the Department of Labor’s minimum wage poster meant an employer was on the hook for years of wage-and-hour violations.
Don’t assume case is over after state court case ends. A recent case shows that even after a decade of litigation, the former employee may add a second federal lawsuit.

If your employee handbook hasn’t been updated in the past six months, it’s out of date. Because employment laws and your business are in a constant state of flux, it’s critical to keep your personnel policies up-to-date. In light of recent legal changes, be sure your policies include these updates:

The NLRB has ordered an employer to reinstate an employee who was fired for posting an obscenity-laden rant about his supervisor on Facebook.
Current and prospective federal contractors that violate employment laws could be barred from doing business with Uncle Sam if new proposed rules from the Department of Labor go through.

If you’re looking for incentives to get managers and supervisors to pay attention during FMLA training sessions, look no further. Simply point out that they can be held personally liable if they deny FMLA benefits to which an employee is entitled ...

While public employees typically have greater protections on the job than employees working in the private sector, they don’t have unlimited protection from interference with their jobs.