Employment Law

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More and more former employees who can’t find lawyers to take their cases are filing their own lawsuits. Their pleadings are frequently long on conclusions and short on factual allegations. Don’t let that give you a false sense of security—or tempt you to toss out documents.

Here’s a warning for employers that want to use arbitration to solve employment-related problems without expensive litigation: Don’t expect to draft the agreement yourself, modify something you find on the Internet or use an English version when employees speak another language, such as Spanish or Viet­­namese.
A new contract grants unionized em­­ployees of New York City's Metropolitan Transit Authority retroactive 1% raises for each of the past two years, which means most will receive one-time payments between $3,000 and $5,000.
Employees who sue for alleged retaliation after reporting safety problems in the workplace have a new and powerful ally: the Cali­for­nia Labor Commissioner’s office, also known as the Division of Labor Standards Enforcement.
Employers defending against Sarbanes-Oxley Act (SOX) whistle-blower retaliation claims should be prepared for a long and tough litigation process. A recent district court decision out of Texas vividly illustrates how long a haul it might be.
The news from the Board is generally pro-employer, but it's time to carefully review your handbooks, applications and offer letters.
Charges of cronyism and nepotism followed a Metropolitan Transit Authority security chief out the door following a meeting with the head of the MTA, which runs public transportation in the New York City area.
Minnesota employers will have some new rules to follow after the state Legislature passed a bill aimed at re­­duc­­ing the gender pay gap and providing more protections to female employees.

An employee recently tried to claim that a customer had retaliated against her for griping on the job. It didn’t work.

The Office of Federal Contract Compliance Programs has released proposed regulations for implementing a White House executive order requiring government contractors and subcontractors to provide summary data on their compensation practices to the Department of Labor.
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