Employment Law

Need employment law advice? Your employee’s hungry attorney knows the latest on employment at will, reasonable accommodations, and more.

Minimize employer liability, optimize labor relations, bullet-proof your employee handbook and update your knowledge of ADA guidelines with our employment law advice.

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Most managers know that it’s against the law to discriminate against employees and applicants because of their race, gender, age, religion or disability. But you may not know that those same federal laws also make it illegal for employers and supervisors to retaliate in any way against employees who voice complaints about on-the-job discrimination.
Among the cases that the U.S. Supreme Court has agreed to hear during its 2015-2016 term is one of particular significance to those in the public sector—Friedrichs v. California Teachers Association. A decision in favor of the plaintiffs has the potential to affect the implementation and regulation of union agency shop fees nationwide.
Don’t look for release of those controversial changes to federal overtime laws anytime soon.
Elizabeth took intermittent leave after hurting her back in an auto accident. Eventually, her boss told her she wouldn’t get a raise for poor attendance ...
The battle to collect the largest EEOC verdict on record continues. A U.S. district judge has overridden a confidential settlement involving a Texas land deal that would have re-directed over half a million dollars away from a class of 32 intellectually disabled former employees of Hill Country Farms.

The Texas Supreme Court has ruled that simply complaining to one’s boss  about allegedly illegal activity is not whistle-blowing protected by the Texas Whistleblower Act. Employees must inform law enforcement.

Disabled employees are entitled to reasonable accommodations that allow them to perform the essential functions of the job they want or have. But, what is an essential function?
Here’s something to consider when contracting with a union. If the contract contains a so-called “evergreen clause,” be sure to follow the directions if you want to cancel the agreement after a term.
Under a new standard, many contingent employment arrangements may open the door to union organizing activities.

For a time, it seemed as if employers were losing every class-action lawsuit filed by hungry lawyers on behalf of one or two named employees. It almost became a legal cottage industry. But now courts are losing patience with some of these lawsuits—especially when the attorneys get sloppy.

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