Employment Law

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A Wisconsin software company on Sept. 6 asked the U.S. Supreme Court to decide whether class-action waivers in employment agreements are legal.
It seems increasingly likely that the U.S. Supreme Court will agree to decide one of the hottest topics in employment law: Whether class-action waivers in employment agreements are legal.
The 5th Circuit Court of Appeals has handed arbitrators the power to decide if arbitration agreements are valid. The appeals court ruled that it was legitimate to ask whether an arbitration agreement applied to an employee’s pre-existing Fair Labor Standards Act claim, but that it was a question best answered not by a judge, but by an arbitrator.
Just because co-workers can be rude doesn’t mean the target of mean comments has a hostile work environment claim — especially when the comments are ambiguous, subject to interpretation and didn’t occur repeatedly.
Starting Dec. 1, the new DOL rules take effect that nearly double the salary threshold at which most salaried workers become exempt from overtime.
Every employer that is subject to the Occupational Safety and Health Act and has more than 10 employees is required to maintain records of occupational injuries and illnesses.
Don’t take employee discretion for granted! You need a confidentiality policy to protect trade secrets and other proprietary information from leaving your organization.
San Miguel Homes for the Elderly, an assisted-living facility in the Bay Area, has ended its militant opposition to U.S. Department of Labor Wage and Hour Division (WHD) enforcement efforts and agreed to pay $425,000 in back wages to 26 caregivers.
The owners of Hibachi City Buffet in Palm Desert, Calif., will pay more than $128,000 in back wages and penalties following an investigation by the U.S. Department of Labor’s Wage and Hour Division.
To win a quid pro quo sexual harassment case, an employee has to show that two things occurred.
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