Employment Law

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The hit television reality show “Stor­­age Wars” has suffered a legal set­­back. A court in Los Angeles has given one of its former stars, Dave Hester, the go-ahead to sue the show’s producers and the A&E cable TV network for retaliation.

A former postal worker has been sentenced to three years of probation after pleading guilty to workers’ compensation fraud. Her problems began in 2009 when co-workers spotted her looking quite fit while competing on television’s “The Price is Right” game show ...

Q. One of the employees in our office has been taping conversations unknown to the people he is taping. Does the employee have a right to do this?
Public employees can't be punished for speaking out on matters of public importance, as long as doing so isn’t an official part of their jobs. Until now, it has been an open question whether a police officer’s complaints about police brutality were protected.
If the California Department of Indus­­­trial Relations comes after you, don’t expect to get away with anything illegal. The department reports that since January 2013, a joint enforcement task force of state regulatory agencies looking for pay and safety violations has wound up citing 83% of work sites inspected.
A California appellate court has invalidated an arbitration agreement on the grounds that it was unconscionable. The court said it was both one-sided and oppressive.
A proposed OSHA rule would require employers of 250 or more employees to submit quarterly injury reports electronically. The rule—to be finalized next year—wouldn’t add new recordkeeping requirements but would accelerate the injury-reporting process.
The U.S. Supreme Court on Nov. 4 heard oral arguments in the first of several employment law cases to be considered in the 2013-2014 term, this one hinging on the question: What does it mean to change clothes?
Q. We have been contemplating developing a dress code. What kinds of legal issues do we need to consider?

The NLRB and EEOC are actively enforcing the position that a blanket policy requiring confidentiality during investigations violates federal labor and employment law. That means employers must proceed carefully and thoughtfully when making confidentiality requests during investigations.

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