Employment Law

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Minimize employer liability, optimize labor relations, bullet-proof your employee handbook and update your knowledge of ADA guidelines with our employment law advice.

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HR Law 101: The Americans with Disabilities Act prohibits discrimination against qualified individuals with disabilities who can perform a job's essential functions with or without reasonable accommodation. All employers that have 15 or more employees must comply with the law ...

HR Law 101: Your supervisors probably understand that they can’t pay a male more than a female to perform the same job or dole out promotions only to males. What they may not appreciate are the more subtle forms that gender discrimination may take. They may not make an effort to scrutinize their decisions to uncover any entrenched patterns of discrimination and practices that discourage women from applying for promotions or asking for raises ...

HR Law 101: The ADA requires employers to walk a fine line between enforcing reasonable workplace safety and behavioral rules and making accommodations for those who are addicted to drugs or alcohol. The law doesn't protect current users of illegal (i.e., “street”) drugs, but it does protect alcoholics and those who’ve shaken their drug addiction sufficiently to no longer be classified as active illegal users ...

The National Labor Relations Board has thrown in the towel in its 2½-year effort to compel most private-sector employers to display a poster informing employees of their right to form or join unions.

HR Law 101: A few years ago, the EEOC released guidelines that clarify employers' responsibilities in applying the ADA to workers with psychiatric disabilities. The law protects persons with mental disabilities, and employers must reasonably accommodate them ...

Q. What is the difference between a right-to-work state and a non-right-to-work state such as Pennsylvania?

HR Law 101: Under the Age Discrimination in Employment Act of 1967, employers with 20 or more workers can’t engage in personnel practices that discriminate against individuals age 40 and older. Most age discrimination cases grow out of wrongful discharge and mandatory retirement policies, but they can involve any adverse change in working conditions ...

HR Law 101: The Employee Retirement Income Security Act of 1974 (ERISA) governs the administration of employee benefit plans and the rights of plan beneficiaries. While many tend to associate ERISA only with retirement benefits, the law covers many other areas ...

Q. How would an employer legally go about monitoring employees in the workplace?

HR Law 101: The Civil Rights Act of 1964 bars discrimination based on race, national origin and religion. The law applies to all employers that have at least 15 full- or part-time workers and includes U.S. companies that employ Americans abroad ...

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