Employment Law

Need employment law advice? Your employee’s hungry attorney knows the latest on employment at will, reasonable accommodations, and more.

Minimize employer liability, optimize labor relations, bullet-proof your employee handbook and update your knowledge of ADA guidelines with our employment law advice.

Page 17 of 507« First...10161718203040...Last »

HR Law 101: The Civil Rights Act of 1964 bars discrimination based on race, national origin and religion. The law applies to all employers that have at least 15 full- or part-time workers and includes U.S. companies that employ Americans abroad ...

HR Law 101: The Employee Retirement Income Security Act (ERISA) governs the administration of employee retirement plans. Pension plans fall into two major categories: qualified and nonqualified plans ...

HR Law 101: Under the ADA, a "reasonable accommodation" enables a qualified individual with a disability to perform the job's essential functions. But an accommodation is considered unreasonable when it causes the employer an undue hardship ...

Q. I recently heard that some of our posters have to be displayed where applicants can see them, not just our employees. Is that true?
California has two new laws affecting employers in the state. The first, signed into law in Au­­gust, applies to employers that prevail in wage-related lawsuits. It limits their ability to obtain attorneys’ fee awards. The second, signed in September, raises California’s minimum wage to $10 per hour by January 2016.
The nonprofit HR organization WorldatWork has urged the Securities and Exchange Commission to reject proposed regulations that would require corporations to report the ratio of CEO pay to that of median employee pay.
New federal subpoena rules that took effect Dec. 1 mean that employers may not have to travel so far to give depositions in civil lawsuits or testify in out-of-state trial courts.
Here’s a good reason to check with your insurance agent on your vehicle accident coverage. A California appellate court has ruled that when an employer requires an employee to use her personal vehicle to visit clients or conduct other company business, the employer may be liable for injuries if she causes an accident.
Think your business is too small to be covered by Cal-OSHA safety regulations? Think again.
Employers have long believed that they could restrict access to information about wages and benefits so employees couldn’t discuss pay rates, raises and so on. If that’s the case at your workplace, check with your attorney. The prohibition may run afoul of the NLRA, which covers the right to unionize.
Page 17 of 507« First...10161718203040...Last »