Employment Law

Need employment law advice? Your employee’s hungry attorney knows the latest on employment at will, reasonable accommodations, and more.

Minimize employer liability, optimize labor relations, bullet-proof your employee handbook and update your knowledge of ADA guidelines with our employment law advice.

Employees have tight deadlines for filing discrimination complaints. But the clock doesn’t start ticking on those deadlines until the employee knows he’s been fired. If you’re terminating someone, be sure to make that clear!

Employees are three-for-three in employment law cases argued before the U.S. Supreme Court this term, now that the Justices have decided that an employee doesn’t have to complain in writing in order to be protected from employer retaliation.
Q. Several of our employees are in the Army Reserve or are on long-term leave due to military deployment. What rules apply?

3M Companies appears poised to settle a high-profile age discrimination suit. Earlier this year, the company filed a joint motion for preliminary ap­proval of a class-action settlement involving approximately 7,000 workers. If the Ramsey County District Court agrees, the employees (and their attorneys) will split $12 million.

When employees who have had serious health crises return to work, employers often worry that they may not be able to work safely. While that may seem like a valid concern for em­ployee welfare, courts seldom see it that way. In fact, if a returning employee also requested reasonable accommodations, refusing to let him return may amount to retaliation for protected activity.

Some employers are apparently still clueless about their obligations to prevent, detect and remedy unlawful harassment.. Lawsuits continue to clog up the legal system as employees keep filing sexual harassment cases. Many of those cases revolve around what happens far from corporate headquarters.
A group of volunteer firefighters for the Amityville Fire Department will share $209,280 after they settled a lawsuit alleging discrimination in the way cash bonuses were handed out.

The 4th Circuit Court of Appeals has finally settled a key question: Can employers and employees settle FMLA disputes without having to get either court or Department of Labor approval? The court said yes, such cases can be settled between the parties without outside interference. That’s good news.

Q. One of our employees broke his ankle while on vacation last summer and he has still not fully recovered. He has been on work restrictions from his physician since the accident, and those restrictions limit his ability to perform job duties that involve walking, standing or lifting. We have accommodated the restrictions, but we recently received a note from his doctor asking us to extend the restrictions for another three months. Do we have to do that or can we simply terminate the employee?
Beth Rist, former Ironton police officer and current Ironton City Council member, appears to have exhausted her legal appeals in her battle to return to uniform. The Ohio Supreme Court has declined to hear her case.