Employment Law

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Q. We want to hire someone who signed a noncompete agreement with his current employer. He asked us to indemnify him in the event his employer sues him. What are the legal risks associated with agreeing to indemnify him?
The Court of Appeals of Ohio has let stand a decision that denied unemployment benefits to a woman who quit her job so she could move with her husband to California.
Two recent settlements make what should be an obvious point: You can’t misappropriate employees’ retirement money and expect to get away with it. Cases in West Chester and Bethlehem show that the feds will come looking for you, and make you pay it back.
Employees won’t get far if they try to sue their employer over discipline that has yet to occur.
Faced with a sick employee, you may recommend short-term disability leave to receive medical treatment. But that could violate the ADA if the employee neither needs nor wants all that time off.
Q. We are selling our small business (15 employees). The company buying us won’t be hiring our staff. How many days’ notice is required to notify our employees? Will our employees qualify for unemployment benefits?
The Human Resources department has a host of responsibilities.  Juggling them is often overwhelming, to say the least.  One small misstep could cost the company hundreds, thousands, and even millions of dollars.  Knowing in which areas of HR's numerous responsibilities the most common pitfalls lurk goes a long way to ensuring that you don't fall into these traps.
Do veterans returning from war with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) qualify as “disabled” under the ADA and, thus, are due accommodations? Questions like that are answered in a new EEOC guidance document.
It’s not up to most managers to write a company’s discipline policy. But it's a manager’s responsibility to interpret, implement and enforce it in a consistent and fair manner. How well do you know your discipline do’s and don’ts? Take this quiz to find out.
It’s do as we say, not as we do when it comes to complying with the Uniformed Services Employment and Reemployment Rights Act (USERRA). A Washington Post investigation found that federal government agencies account for 18% of all USERRA complaints filed by returning service members.