Employment Law

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Frivo­­lous lawsuits can take up lots of time and cost thousands of dollars in legal fees before it’s all over. Fortunately, courts are becoming more willing to punish truly frivolous lawsuits and the employees who bring them.
Taking a page from the Democratic Party’s midterm election playbook, Gov. Mark Dayton signed a bill raising the state minimum wage. The state’s current minimum wage of $6.15 per hour is below the federal rate of $7.25.
Before the Randleman Police Department moved to new facilities last Novem­­ber, Chief Steve Leonard ordered an inventory of the evidence room. The tally found that $7,800 in cash was missing.
The ACA health care reform law amended the Fair Labor Standards Act to require employers to provide a place for nursing mothers to express breast milk. The law includes specific requirements the space must meet to comply.
Sometimes a case that looks like it will end in a win for the employer ends in a surprise adverse jury verdict. Before you despair, remember that it’s not over. There may be room for a reversal.
New legislation that went into effect April 10 is intended to curtail misclassification of transportation industry workers as independent contractors instead of employees.
To stay out of the cross-hairs, review your separation agreements and revise any language that could be seen as too broad.
Q. We heard that the president recently took action on whether employees are permitted to discuss compensation. Are there any new requirements on employers with regard to these kinds of conversations?
On May 29, Gov. Mark Dayton signed Minnesota’s new medical mari­­juana bill into law. Unlike similar laws in other states, this law specifically amends a state law—the Minne­­sota Con­­trolled Substance Act—to carve out exemptions for those permitted to use medical marijuana.
Former public employees who claim they were fired in retaliation for reporting alleged illegal activity can sue for retaliation under the Minnesota whistle-blower law. But, they must start their lawsuit within two years of first being notified that their job will be eliminated.
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