Employment Background Check

Our field-tested solutions are designed to assist you with employee background checks, background check guidelines and pre-employment screening.

You’ll also gain a full understanding of the Fair Credit Reporting Act, to guarantee you’re in compliance with every facet of employment background checks

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Starting Jan. 13, 2013, employers that obtain background checks from consumer reporting agencies must give applicants and employees a new, updated version of the Summary of Rights under the Fair Credit Reporting Act form.
A new Ohio law designed to make convicted criminals more employable means you must immediately review your hiring practices.

It is essential that employers conduct comprehensive and legal background checks to corroborate job applicants' qualifications or delete them from consideration. Employee background investigations that involve checking references, driving records, criminal records, and credit records require adherence to state statutes and federal laws, such as the Fair Credit Reporting Act.

Every employer using credit reports to make employment decisions must abide by the Fair Credit Reporting Act (FCRA). To do that, employers must have a legitimate business need for consumer credit reports, and must take certain steps both before and after they initiate an adverse action based on those reports to avoid violating the law.
Earlier this year, the EEOC issued up­­dated guidance on how employers should use arrest and con­­viction records when making hiring decisions. If you use criminal background checks to screen applicants and employees, this affects you! Fact: Checks that were once routine are now under the gun.
In April, the EEOC issued a new Enforcement Guidance document on the use of criminal history information in making hiring and other employment decisions. In light of the guidance and the EEOC’s increased focus on discrimination in hiring, employers should review and update their criminal history screening policies and practices.

Workplace lawsuits arise from negligent hiring when failure to conduct comprehensive background checks leads to employee-instigated injury or harm. Background investigations into past employment histories and possible felony convictions are just two of the steps necessary to lower the liability for being hit by negligent hiring legal claims.

New, official EEOC guidance reinforces the commission’s view that using criminal histories to screen out job applicants can violate Title VII of the Civil Rights Act by having a disparate impact on minorities.

Reference checking should be part of every company's hiring process. Due to fear of lawsuits, though, many former employers may be reluctant to provide much information about candidates you're considering. Here are various techniques to use to elicit this important information from them.

Q. An employer asked us for a job verification on an employee we fired. The request includes a written consent form from the worker allowing the query. Can I release any and all information regarding the former employee’s history with us?
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