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Employment Background Check

Our field-tested solutions are designed to assist you with employee background checks, background check guidelines and pre-employment screening.

You’ll also gain a full understanding of the Fair Credit Reporting Act, to guarantee you’re in compliance with every facet of employment background checks

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New, official EEOC guidance reinforces the commission’s view that using criminal histories to screen out job applicants can violate Title VII of the Civil Rights Act by having a disparate impact on minorities.

Reference checking should be part of every company's hiring process. Due to fear of lawsuits, though, many former employers may be reluctant to provide much information about candidates you're considering. Here are various techniques to use to elicit this important information from them.

Q. An employer asked us for a job verification on an employee we fired. The request includes a written consent form from the worker allowing the query. Can I release any and all information regarding the former employee’s history with us?
Sen. Chuck Schumer (D-N.Y.) and Sen. Richard Blumenthal (D-Conn.) have asked the DOJ and the EEOC to issue an opinion on one of today’s hot-button employment law issues: Is it a violation of the Stored Communications Act or any other federal law for an employer to ask job applicants to provide their Facebook passwords?
The state Department of Human Services failed to check educational and employment references for the director of the state’s largest mental hospital, according to a report by Minnesota Public Radio.
Here’s some good news for em­­ployers that check workers’ compensation claims against an applicant’s claim he’s never been injured on the job: You don’t have to inform him where you got the information be­­fore you take action because workers’ comp checks aren’t background in­­vestigations subject to the federal Fair Credit Reporting Act.
New EEOC guidance makes it clear: Employers better be able to prove they have a good business reason for running criminal background checks on job applicants. That means it's time for you to review your job applications and hiring policies—and start training hiring managers on what's certain to be a major EEOC enforcement effort.
Employers may be suspicious about a prospective worker’s claimed professional credentials or other certifications—especially if it seems like the documents may have been altered or forged. If you have such doubts, don’t hesitate to ask for clarification.
Florida State Sen. Gary Siplin has introduced a bill that would limit an employer’s use of an applicant’s credit history as a hiring criterion unless it “is shown to be directly related to the position sought by the applicant.”
The EEOC received a record 99,947 charges in 2011. Given this sharp increase in charge activity, now's a good time to review your personnel policies. Consider two EEOC enforcement trends: scrutiny of background checks and inflexible leave policies.
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