Employment Background Check

Our field-tested solutions are designed to assist you with employee background checks, background check guidelines and pre-employment screening.

You’ll also gain a full understanding of the Fair Credit Reporting Act, to guarantee you’re in compliance with every facet of employment background checks

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Q. When should we be doing our background checks: Before an offer is made? After the offer is made and before employment? Or after employment has begun? We generally do the check after we make an offer and before employment starts. 
When negotiating contracts with employee outsourcing firms, many organizations make background checks an afterthought and leave the specifics up to the agency. That’s a big mistake.
The EEOC has filed separate lawsuits against BMW and the Dollar General retail chain, alleging that the companies’ criminal background check policies illegally resulted in employees being fired and others being screened out for employment in violation of Title VII.
The NAACP and the advocacy group Take Action Minnesota have accused retail giant Target of unfair hiring practices, alleging that the chain unnecessarily rejects job applicants based on their criminal records.
The Office of Federal Contract Compliance Programs has issued new guidance about how and when federal contractors may use a job applicant’s criminal background in the hiring process.

Q. We are considering instituting a criminal background check policy for all employee positions. We’ve heard scary stories of lawsuits regarding negligent hiring, and we’d really like to avoid that sort of litigation, not to mention the negative media attention. Is there any downside to having an “across the board” criminal background check policy?

Starting Jan. 13, 2013, employers that obtain background checks from consumer reporting agencies must give applicants and employees a new, updated version of the Summary of Rights under the Fair Credit Reporting Act form.
A new Ohio law designed to make convicted criminals more employable means you must immediately review your hiring practices.

It is essential that employers conduct comprehensive and legal background checks to corroborate job applicants' qualifications or delete them from consideration. Employee background investigations that involve checking references, driving records, criminal records, and credit records require adherence to state statutes and federal laws, such as the Fair Credit Reporting Act.

Every employer using credit reports to make employment decisions must abide by the Fair Credit Reporting Act (FCRA). To do that, employers must have a legitimate business need for consumer credit reports, and must take certain steps both before and after they initiate an adverse action based on those reports to avoid violating the law.
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