Employee Benefits Program

A strong employee benefits program – including low-cost employee incentives, employee recognition programs, and employee appreciation programs – can help you improve morale and retention.

We provide employee appreciation day ideas, help you with employee retention strategies and employee benefits management

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Legislation recently introduced in Congress would require employers with 15 or more workers to provide at least seven days of paid sick leave per employee per year. The so-called “Healthy Families Act” would guarantee workers at least one paid hour off for every 30 hours worked.

Surveys of U.S. workers consistently show that employees want more than a paycheck from their jobs—they want to feel safe, secure and appreciated at work. Here are eight guidelines for recognizing and rewarding employees, according to an Adecco management report.

The 6th Circuit Court of Appeals has given the go-ahead to a RICO lawsuit brought by six truckers against their employer. Traditionally, prosecutors use RICO to combat organized crime. But the truckers allege their employer, Cassens Transport Co., conspired with its claims adjuster and doctors to illegally deny them workers’ compensation benefits.

Q. We recently had to discharge an employee for poor work performance. We are a relatively small company (70 employees) and don’t often fire people. Because of special circumstances that forced us to terminate the employee rather than try corrective action, we think it is very possible there will be some kind of litigation. Do you have any recommendations for what we should do or think about now, even before any lawsuit has been filed?

Bridgeport-based employee benefits firm Penn-Mont faces charges from the U.S. Department of Labor claiming the company failed to pay full death benefits to the families of deceased employees covered under its plans.

Sometimes, employees hesitate to tell supervisors about their medical problems, especially if they feel there’s a stigma associated with the condition. But if the employee misses work and is fired, she can’t use the medical excuse to get unemployment compensation benefits.

Jamaal Johnson, a GED instructor at Nash Community College, submitted a note from Dr. Raymond Baule stating he needed to miss two months of work. It didn’t offer a specific reason, and Baule was not a certified workers’ compensation physician.

According to a complaint filed with the DOL, Kellogg Auto Supply of Cortland disbursed ESOP benefits in 1999 based on the stock’s 1998 valuation. But it made no further distributions until 2008. The DOL filed suit charging the company and its president, Richard Coates, with violating ERISA.

If your company franchises operations in Minnesota, you probably aren’t responsible if a franchisee’s employees are injured—even if you conduct an annual safety inspection.

The recession is taking a heavy toll on Minnesota jobs, and the state’s 8.8% unemployment rate is higher than the national average. Duluth and St. Cloud had the highest unemployment rate in the state—9.8%. The nationwide unemployment rate was 8.1%.