Employee Benefits Program

A strong employee benefits program – including low-cost employee incentives, employee recognition programs, and employee appreciation programs – can help you improve morale and retention.

We provide employee appreciation day ideas, help you with employee retention strategies and employee benefits management

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Looking to build a culture that appeals to baby boomers, Gen X, Gen Y and young “Millennials”? Think it’s time to ramp up benefits that serve the needs of executives, production workers, full-timers and part-timers alike? Want yours to be known as a cool place to work? Choose from these six strategies uncovered by the Best Companies Group and Outside magazine in the process of compiling Outside’s 2010 “Best Places to Work” list.

For too many employers, “benefits education” consists of dropping an annual benefits statement in front of the workers and saying, “See you next year.” However, a new Hewitt Associates survey says U.S. workers’ biggest complaint about their employee benefits isn’t cost or access—it’s that employees don’t understand the benefits they already have. Here are inexpensive ways HR can educate employees year-round:

In each monthly issue, our HR Specialist: Compensation & Benefits newsletter reports on creative employee benefit and compensation programs being offered by U.S. employers. Those are published in the What’s Working column of each issue. Here’s a sampling of recent articles:
Home improvement giant Lowe’s is offering free health screenings to its employees. Lowe’s partnerships with health care providers throughout New York mean employees will be able to get free checks of their blood pressure, total cholesterol, triglycerides, glucose, waist size, hip size, weight, height, body fat percentage and body-mass index.
Whenever a case moves from state court into the federal court system, costs go up and delays become frequent because dockets are so crowded. That’s one reason a recent decision by a federal court to send a case back to the North Carolina court system is good news. The case involved a workers’ compensation retaliation claim ...

Every year, employers face yet another increase in their health insurance premiums. And if there are many older or sick employees, those costs will keep on rising. Even adding one sick child to the list can drive costs into the stratosphere. But before you even consider firing (or refusing to hire) someone because they might jack up insurance costs, count your dollars, not your pennies. You might be staring down a lawsuit that could dwarf whatever premium costs you hoped to avoid.

Independent contractors aren’t eligible for unemployment compensation, and their clients don’t have to pay into the unemployment compensation trust fund, as the following case shows.
Q. I know a number of states already have laws that require employers to provide unpaid breaks to nursing mothers to express breast milk. Are there any federal laws providing for similar requirements?
The U.S. Department of Labor has answered a seemingly simple question that vexed many Washington insiders for months: Under the new health care reform law, what is the age limit for employees’ adult children to be eligible for coverage under a parent’s group health plan?
Every type of employee leave is different. Some leave requests involve difficult personal issues, while others can cause workplace morale problems. Plus, every state has different leave laws. What's worse, the costs of employee absenteeism—reflected in lost production, overtime and temporary replacements for the absent worker—can add up quickly. What's the best way to combat the problem?
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