Employee Benefits Program

A strong employee benefits program – including low-cost employee incentives, employee recognition programs, and employee appreciation programs – can help you improve morale and retention.

We provide employee appreciation day ideas, help you with employee retention strategies and employee benefits management

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Work is usually a “family affair” for small business owners. Typically, your spouse will pitch in whenever and wherever help is needed. Strategy: Officially put your spouse on the company payroll. If you employ a previously unemployed spouse, your company may be eligible for the new HIRE Act tax breaks. But even if you don’t qualify for the HIRE breaks, there are at least six potential tax benefits for the taking.
Group health plans that were in effect when the big reform law was signed on March 23, 2010, can earn “grandfather” status. Employers will lose their grandfather status if they change insurance carriers or “substantially increase” out-of-pocket costs for employees.
If your organization is targeted by a union-organizing effort, take note. Labor law gives your employees the right to join a union. Assuming you prefer to operate as a nonunion company, what are your rights?

If the unsteady economy doesn’t improve during the next six months, one in four HR professionals say their organizations are “very likely” to respond with wage freezes, according to a new poll. What's your Plan B if the recession double-dips?

If you have a policy that tries to limit employees’ Internet use, make sure your IT department has an accurate and very specific way to measure that usage. Otherwise, an employee who’s fired for violating the policy may end up collecting unemployment compensation.

Q. Our employees have company-issued cell phones with global positioning systems capabilities. Can we use the GPS to track employees’ movements without telling them we are doing so?
Recently, the 3rd Circuit Court of Appeals had a chance to declare that an informal internal complaint about ERISA-covered benefits might be enough to protect an employee from retaliation. Fortunately for employers, it declined to do so.
Q. A replacement line supervisor directed an employee in our plant to use a machine he wasn’t trained to operate. The employee was injured when he stuck his hand into the machine to clear a jam. While the employee was recuperating in the hospital, the plant supervisor fired him for operating machinery he hadn’t been trained on. Does the employee have a right to sue us if the line supervisor ordered him to do this job?

It’s probably the toughest part of a benefits administrator’s job: choosing next year’s health insurance plan. If they’re lucky, benefits pros have powerful allies in that high-stakes game: insurance brokers. But some brokers are little more than order-takers. If you’re starting to think your broker is part of the problem and not part of the benefits solution, maybe it’s time to look for a new one.

Q. When we make changes to our medical plan, how long do we have to get the new summary plan out to employees?