Employee Benefits Program

A strong employee benefits program – including low-cost employee incentives, employee recognition programs, and employee appreciation programs – can help you improve morale and retention.

We provide employee appreciation day ideas, help you with employee retention strategies and employee benefits management

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U.S. workers value health care and medical benefits above all other workplace perks. A new SHRM poll found these benefits were rated most important.
Are some of your benefits—such as bonuses or other merit payments at retirement or departure—contingent on complying with a covenant-not-to-complete? Chances are the benefits plan administrator—not a federal court—will be interpreting the terms.
Employees know they should save for retirement. Nevertheless, the percentage of employees with less than $1,000 socked away has risen substantially since the economic collapse of 2008.
Americans are more confident that they’ll be able to retire comfortably than they have been in years, but their confidence may be based on little more than wishful thinking. That’s one way to read the results of the Employee Benefit Research Institute’s 24th annual Retirement Confidence Survey.
Two-thirds of small business owners polled say they offer health insurance to their employees. However, size matters—the more employees, the more likely they receive health benefits.
Q. In the wake of United States v. Windsor, we have extended a number of our employee benefits to same-sex married couples. Can you provide any guidance on the proper treatment of flexible spending account (FSA) expenses and health savings account (HSA) and dependent care assistance program (DCAP) contribution limits for same-sex married couples?
Only about 20% of managed 401(k) funds deliver better returns that those that are simply indexed to broader market performance, according to research conducted by the Vanguard mutual fund investment company.
Most employers plan to continue sponsoring health benefits for their employees, but will change the way those benefits are managed and delivered in the coming years. New research finds that traditional models for providing employer-sponsored health benefits will continue, while private insurance exchanges are emerging as corporate America’s new favored way to provide coverage.

The news is full of reports on the premiums being paid for health coverage acquired through the Affordable Care Act’s insurance exchanges. Depending on the political spin, they’re either onerously expensive or ridiculously cheap. Could the truth be somewhere in the middle?

The cost of providing employer-sponsored health care benefits is expected to increase 4.4% this year, a slight uptick from 2013, when cost increases fell to a 15-year low, according to an annual survey by Towers Watson and the National Business Group on Health, an association of large employers.
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