Discrimination and Harassment

Discrimination and harassment claims often increase in a down economy. Learn the proper techniques for conducing proper workplace harassment investigations, providing sexual harassment training, and more to reduce claims of employment discrimination and preventing sexual harassment in the workplace.

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A Virginia home-building company dragged its feet when a qualified female employee sought to be promoted to a purchasing manager, according to a lawsuit filed by the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission.
If you decide to terminate an older employee and hire a younger replacement, assume that you will be sued for age discrimination.
Employees have a right to reasonable accommodation of their religious practices. That means employers must try to find ways for employees to exercise their beliefs unless doing so would be an undue burden.
2015 saw much media attention focused on the activities of coaches and players off the field—for the wrong reasons.
Some California employees who are victims of domestic violence have limited job protection when they need time off for treatment, court dates or other related events.

Supervisors and HR walk a legal tightrope when discussing retirement plans with older workers. If it appears you’re pushing an employee out the door based on his age—or if you suddenly eliminate his position after discussing retirement—you’ll be setting yourself up for an age discrimination lawsuit.

A Saint Louis Park, Minn., orthodontist has learned the hard way that you can’t offer a job but then rescind it when you learn your new hire is pregnant.

Employees who claim they quit be-cause their employer wouldn’t address harassment or discrimination are eligible for unemployment compensation benefits—if they gave the employer a chance to remedy the situation.
Here’s a common sense conclusion: Firing someone you suspect may be a racist is a legitimate decision.
An attorney with long experience working for Pennsylvania state agencies has filed an EEOC complaint alleging that the state’s Office of Open Records refused to hire him because of his age.