Discrimination and Harassment

Discrimination and harassment claims often increase in a down economy. Learn the proper techniques for conducing proper workplace harassment investigations, providing sexual harassment training, and more to reduce claims of employment discrimination and preventing sexual harassment in the workplace.

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HR Law 101: A clearly written, thoughtful sexual harassment policy clarifies your position to everyone on your staff, including potential perpetrators and their victims. It also provides solid proof to judges and juries that you’re committed to eliminating and preventing sexual harassment. You may use this model policy or adapt it for your organization.

Ordinarily, the ADA doesn’t protect employees who have temporary physical problems that don’t last long or seriously interfere with their lives. But ailments and conditions that last indefinitely are another matter. That’s especially true for a veteran who the VA has rated as partially disabled by service-related injuries.
When so-called pro se litigants represent themselves before the EEOC and in federal court, you’ll need patience. It will pay off in the long run.
How would you respond if an employee raised a harassment complaint? Rely on these tips:
Here’s a tip for handling em­­ployees undergoing sex changes: Make sure the employee isn’t har­­assed and that it’s business as usual in the workplace. Treat the employee as you always have and don’t fear legitimate discipline or an evaluation based on performance.
Five former employees of Min­­ne­­tonka’s Equity Bank have agreed to a settlement in a lawsuit that alleged that the bank’s CEO barraged them with vulgar tirades, threatened to burn down their houses, kill them and dismember their children.

Following your own rules for discipline, promotion and evaluation is the best defense against a discrimination lawsuit. But that doesn’t mean you can’t make exceptions to your rules when the situation calls for it. Just make sure that you document why you made the exception at the time you did.

HR Law 101: Don’t hesitate to inform employees about their right to report sexual harassment to the EEOC or a state agency. Your failure to provide information about alternatives to internal reporting won’t prevent employees from seeking redress from a government authority ...

Employers can control some hazardous work conditions, but not all of them. What a particular customer or client may do when he comes in contact with an employee likely falls into the uncontrollable category.
The EEOC is suing Canonsburg-based CONSOL Energy on behalf of an evangelical Christian who retired from his job rather than submit to biometric scanning designed to track his work time and activities.
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