Discrimination and Harassment

Discrimination and harassment claims often increase in a down economy. Learn the proper techniques for conducing proper workplace harassment investigations, providing sexual harassment training, and more to reduce claims of employment discrimination and preventing sexual harassment in the workplace.

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Q. A new employee has just informed his supervisor that he can't work any overtime. Can we legally fire this person? —G.M., Virginia

You know the workplace should be free of racially or sexually charged comments and that supervisors most certainly shouldn't engage in such banter. But you can't wipe prejudice out of every employee's mind ...

If economic conditions force you to downsize, be prepared for lawsuits. That's especially true if no employees stand out as obvious poor performers who should be canned. In such cases, articulate that you have no choice but to fire "the worst of the best" ...

The New Jersey Department of Labor recently announced the 2007 benefit levels for unemployment insurance, disability insurance and workers' compensation. Under New Jersey law, those benefits are adjusted annually, based on fluctuations in the statewide average weekly wage ...

Casting admiring glances or making other such flirtatious gestures toward a co-worker isn't sexual harassment under the Florida Civil Rights Act. That law doesn't require employers to guarantee that employees won't ever look at each other in a way perceived as a "come-on" ...

While employers should typically use the same education and experience requirements for all applicants for the same position, they needn’t do so in every case ...

You and the supervisors at your organization may already know how to handle a sexual harassment complaint that appears genuine. But what should you do when you seriously doubt that a claim is legit? ...

You may think it's obvious, but it has taken a federal appeals court to make clear that employees have no federal right to competent employment-law counsel, as offered in criminal cases. Employees who pick incompetent attorneys don't get a second chance to sue. That's good news for employers, who won't have to face the same lawsuit again if an employee's less-than-stellar lawyer bumbles the case ...

When employers offer severance packages, they often ask employees to waive their rights to sue the employer. That's a smart strategy, but small discrepancies in the agreement's wording can make the difference between a successful severance package and a call from the EEOC ...

You may believe that interns, volunteers or other unpaid helpers aren’t official “employees” so they can’t sue for discrimination. You’d be wrong ...

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