Discrimination and Harassment

Discrimination and harassment claims often increase in a down economy. Learn the proper techniques for conducing proper workplace harassment investigations, providing sexual harassment training, and more to reduce claims of employment discrimination and preventing sexual harassment in the workplace.

Issue: New federal rules say how far your organization must go to make its property accessible to disabled staff and customers. Risk: Ignoring the rules ...
Applicants will slap anything on their résumés if they think it will attract the recruiter's eye. So, recognizing the soaring cost of health insurance, more applicants are adding a Health Profile ...
Q: You must occasionally talk tough to employees who underperform, act unruly or act in other ways that can hurt the organization. But how can you be forceful without unintentionally using insensitive speech that invites a harassment complaint or, even worse, a lawsuit? A: It’s more important than ever for you to walk that fine […]
Issue: Can you encourage employees to report on-the-job harassment from union organizers? Risk: Your efforts may be viewed as an illegal union-busting ...
Now would be a good time to review your organization's hiring, firing, promotion and pay policies for any hint of gender-based differences. Reason: The big Wal-Mart sex discrimination lawsuit that hit ...
Legal threats from interoffice romance typically come from harassment claims if the relationship sours. But here comes a new threat: employees who claim a "hostile environment" when favoritism caused by another ...
When employees request job accommodations for their disabilities, you must interact with them to find reasonable modifications. But it's important to know how far your organization must stretch the job to ...
When checking applicants' references, some employers like to do an "end run" around the HR department. They'll call the applicant's former supervisor directly to find out the dirt on the person. ...
Employers are very leery about firing pregnant employees, and rightly so. But don't let your lawsuit fears paralyze you from taking legal, appropriate actions.
In short, federal law requires that ...
If workers want to bring retaliation lawsuits against their employers, they must prove they suffered an "adverse employment action," such as being fired, threatened or denied a promotion. But a court ...