Discrimination and Harassment

Discrimination and harassment claims often increase in a down economy. Learn the proper techniques for conducing proper workplace harassment investigations, providing sexual harassment training, and more to reduce claims of employment discrimination and preventing sexual harassment in the workplace.

Issue: Many small organizations waste time and money complying with employment laws that apply only to larger businesses.
Benefit: By knowing which laws you can ignore, you'll trim your workload ...
The U.S. Supreme Court historically starts new terms on the first Monday in October. This year, for
the first time in three decades, it began work in September. Reason: to ...
You've got a new reason to take a harder line on sexual banter and crude antics in the workplace. One of the most conservative courts of appeal sent a clear message ...
Issue: A new ruling lowers the bar on what courts consider sexual harassment.
Risk: Allowing "boys to be boys", even if they don't target anyone for abuse, can now cost ...
When it comes to establishing "reasonable accommodations" for disabled employees, the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) puts the burden squarely on employees' shoulders to speak up about their needs for accommodation. ...
Issue: With the job market flooded with experienced and skilled people, the temptation rises for hiring managers to use "overqualified" as a weeding-out method.
Risk: Courts could view your use ...
A person's religion is not like his sex or race, something obvious from a glance. That's why Title VII imposes a duty on workers to provide fair warning of any employment ...
Issue: Overweight employees cost you more in health care costs, and new research proves it. But you can't discriminate against them.
Risk: More courts are saying that obesity is a ...
If you perform pre-employment medical tests on applicants, take your cues from the following case to avoid running afoul of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA). Three lessons to remember:
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The EEOC is coming after you for workplace discrimination. Now what? One good source, surprisingly, is the EEOC's own site, which now offers a section titled "EEOC Investigations, What an Employer ...