Discrimination and Harassment

Discrimination and harassment claims often increase in a down economy. Learn the proper techniques for conducing proper workplace harassment investigations, providing sexual harassment training, and more to reduce claims of employment discrimination and preventing sexual harassment in the workplace.

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The best harassment policy in the world isn't worth the paper it's written on if employees don't take it seriously. To show your policy has teeth, you have to let it bite ...

Workplace humor is fine until it drifts into the realm of gags about employees' gender, race or religion. Even age-based jokes can trigger lawsuits. Although few employees will win age-discrimination lawsuits based on a joke or two, such juvenile behavior can take an otherwise marginal case and give it legal legs ...

Pennsylvania mirrors America's growing diversity in many ways. Today, mosques occupy old churches; co-workers wear burqas and yarmulkes; and some employees request "prayer breaks." Religious diversity is a reason for celebration in a pluralistic society, but it also presents challenges in the workplace ...

If you're a religious organization, don't be intimidated by employees invoking anti-discrimination laws as a way to protest your legitimate religious mission. When it comes to how you manage religious staff, government must keep its hands off ...

To make a "constructive discharge" claim, employees must show that their working conditions were so intolerable that they had no choice but to quit and that those conditions amounted to discrimination based on age, race, sex or some other protected characteristic. But, as a new ruling shows, an employee's subjective "fear of future discipline" isn't grounds for a lawsuit under this constructive-discharge theory ...

If your organization is a religious institution, you may not have adopted anti-discrimination policies or practices because you think you can rely on the “ministerial exception.” But, as a new case shows, that may not always be the case ...

The Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC), the agency that enforces workplace anti-discrimination laws, has lost 20 percent of its work force since 2001. And it may suffer another budget cut in the coming FY2007 federal budget ...
 

When hiring, you probably use the job description to establish the minimum requirements for the position. But what if no one in the applicant pool meets those minimum requirements? ...

Don't assume that only minorities have a right to sue you for workplace race discrimination. White employees also are entitled to work in an environment free of racial bias, and they can challenge hiring practices that interfere with that right ...

When employees sue your organization, it can be tempting for supervisors to keep a closer eye on those litigious employees to make sure they’re “playing by the rules.” But be careful: If you suddenly start enforcing your company’s existing rules or turn into Big Brother, you could end up facing a second lawsuit, for retaliation ...