Discrimination and Harassment

Discrimination and harassment claims often increase in a down economy. Learn the proper techniques for conducing proper workplace harassment investigations, providing sexual harassment training, and more to reduce claims of employment discrimination and preventing sexual harassment in the workplace.

Remind managers never to base employment decisions on how they believe employees would act based on their gender, race, religion or disability. Make sure managers focus solely on the performance itself, ...
Ever since the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) took effect a dozen years ago, hiring managers have walked a legal tightrope in job interviews. ADA’s basic message is that you can’t ask pre-employment questions that could reveal the applicant’s disability. But the law sets different rules for different stages of the hiring process, including: Pre-offer. [...]
Camera phones now make up more than 4 percent of all worldwide cell phone sales. By 2007, more than half of all cell phones will be equipped with cameras, and cell ...
Your employment policies should never leave employees guessing about how they must comply.
That's why it's vital to use concrete terms in your
policies that discuss employee behaviors and ...
If your organization offers health insurance to retired employees, an important new Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) ruling says you can reduce or eliminate those benefits after the ex-employee becomes eligible ...
The U.S. Supreme Court last month set a four-year statute of limitations in so-called "Section 1981" discrimination cases.
While most employees file discrimination cases under Title VII of the Civil ...
The Supreme Court ruled May 17 that disabled people can sue state governments for failing to provide them access to courthouses, voting booths or other public services.
Previously, states had ...

Be very leery about setting rules that ban one gender or another from certain positions. Such a policy may be legal if you can prove that gender is a bona fide occupational qualification (BFOQ) for a position. But courts will likely be skeptical if the job can be done by both sexes without violating any laws or with an easy accommodation.

You don't want to play den mother to your employees, but a new trend gaining publicity may put you in that role. So-called "workplace bullying" is no longer something you can shrug off. If you see it, you'd better try to stop it.

Many employees forget—or don't realize—that employer-provided benefits make up a big portion of their compensation.