Discrimination and Harassment

Discrimination and harassment claims often increase in a down economy. Learn the proper techniques for conducing proper workplace harassment investigations, providing sexual harassment training, and more to reduce claims of employment discrimination and preventing sexual harassment in the workplace.

The business-etiquette columnist (aka Judith Martin) argues that casual business environments have all but destroyed formality in the workplace, with potentially disastrous results for you as a leader. Some examples:
Don't make the mistake of assuming that your obligation to investigate a harassment complaint ends when the victimized employee quits.
Reason: The U.S. Supreme Court just ruled that employees who ...
If your workplace has a "creative" side to it, listen up: A court has ruled for the first time that you can defend a sexual harassment claim by arguing a "creative ...
A school district hired a man rather than Geraldine Fuhr as varsity boys head basketball coach. While the man had two years of experience, Fuhr had been the varsity girls head ...
Issue: Courts are seeing a spike in discrimination claims involving people of the same race.
Risk: Some supervisors wrongly ignore same-race complaints, believing, for example, that "blacks can't discriminate against ...
If you're involved in termination decisions, don't always take supervisors' comments at face value. Consider doing your own investigation before taking action. Your goal is to independently verify the information you're ...
Issue: Whether employees who resign have the same right to file harassment lawsuits as those who are fired. Risk/benefit: A new Supreme Court ruling says "Yes," quitters can sue. But ...
Remind managers never to base employment decisions on how they believe employees would act based on their gender, race, religion or disability. Make sure managers focus solely on the performance itself, ...
Ever since the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) took effect a dozen years ago, hiring managers have walked a legal tightrope in job interviews. ADA’s basic message is that you can’t ask pre-employment questions that could reveal the applicant’s disability. But the law sets different rules for different stages of the hiring process, including: Pre-offer. [...]
Camera phones now make up more than 4 percent of all worldwide cell phone sales. By 2007, more than half of all cell phones will be equipped with cameras, and cell ...