Discrimination and Harassment

Discrimination and harassment claims often increase in a down economy. Learn the proper techniques for conducing proper workplace harassment investigations, providing sexual harassment training, and more to reduce claims of employment discrimination and preventing sexual harassment in the workplace.

If your organization is hit with an employee lawsuit, consider having your attorney check for a bankruptcy filing by the employee who sues you. If the lawsuit isn't listed as an asset with ...
When an employee makes noise about discrimination, it's natural to become defensive. It hurts to be accused of
breaking the law, especially if it isn't true. But don't let a ...
In sexual harassment cases, your worst-case scenario is harassment by a supervisor. That's because sex harassment by a supervisor resulting in a tangible employment action (firing, demotion, pay cut, etc.) is ...
Hopefully, you already take any discrimination or harassment complaints from minority employees seriously. But what if a white male blows the whistle about race discrimination he sees affecting his minority co-workers? ...
The EEOC announced in 2003 that it would work to counteract workplace discrimination against Hispanic employees, and the agency is making good on its promise.
EEOC chief Cari Dominquez, who ...
When terminating employees, it's smart to ask them to sign agreements that waive their rights to sue your organization for discrimination or wrongful discharge. Typically, employers wrap such waivers into severance ...
As if there weren't enough complications when co-workers are paramours, here's another: Those who aren't part
of the love affair feel slighted when
the bedded ones are promoted, and ...
Issue: Employers can be liable for sexual harassment if they "knew or should have known" about it but failed to act.
Risk: Courts increasingly say you "know" of harassment once ...
What if an employee complains to you or another manager about a co-worker’s inappropriate comments or touching? What should you do with that complaint? As recent court cases show, you need to pass along any such complaints, even if you think they’re fairly mild, to the HR department. Federal law says employers can be liable [...]
Employers can be liable for harassment of workers not only by other workers, but also by customers. But often, managers who'd have no qualms about investigating—or firing—a harassing co-worker are nervous about jeopardizing a customer relationship.