Discrimination and Harassment

Discrimination and harassment claims often increase in a down economy. Learn the proper techniques for conducing proper workplace harassment investigations, providing sexual harassment training, and more to reduce claims of employment discrimination and preventing sexual harassment in the workplace.

If you hire emotionally disabled employees, be sure to integrate them into your regular staff meetings and events. Avoid treating them as a separate (even if equal) component of your work force ...

Employers looking for ways to accommodate disabled applicants or employees have a valuable resource close at hand at Georgia Tech ...

Courts view interns the same as employees: as “agents” of your organization. So should you. If you use interns or plan to, advise supervisors to manage them as closely as employees, if not more so. And apply your workplace policies to them ...

The federal job anti-discrimination law (Title VII of the Civil Rights Act) prohibits two types of discrimination: disparate treatment and disparate impact. Because automated tests, such as résumé-screening programs, are blind to applicants' race, religion, gender and national origin, they likely can't create a disparate-treatment case. However, such programs can still have a disparate impact on minorities ...

You’ve no doubt hired a candidate who looks great on paper but quickly shows deficiencies. The experience he or she listed on the résumé isn’t apparent when the person starts work. Before long, you realize your mistake and fire the new employee, who then sues for discrimination ...

Gargiulo Inc., one of Florida’s largest fruit and vegetable wholesalers, will pay $215,000 to settle sexual harassment lawsuits on behalf of female Haitian workers at its tomato packinghouse in Immokalee ...

HR Law 101: The EEOC has become proactive in protecting workers from a sexually hostile environment. In 2007 alone, the agency recovered from employers nearly $50 million for victims of harassment ...

HR Law 101: When a new hire comes on board, you must determine whether to classify him or her as exempt or nonexempt under the FLSA. The key consideration: Exempt workers aren’t eligible for overtime pay. Rather, they’re paid for the job they do, not the hours they keep ...

HR Law 101: When an eligible employee returns from FMLA leave, the employer must restore him or her to the same position or an equivalent one with equivalent benefits, pay and other terms and conditions of employment. The new position must involve the same or substantially similar duties, responsibilities and authority ...

HR Law 101: When independent contractors are acting as a company’s agents, the company is liable for their actions, according to a U.S. Supreme Court ruling in 2003 ...