Discrimination and Harassment

Discrimination and harassment claims often increase in a down economy. Learn the proper techniques for conducing proper workplace harassment investigations, providing sexual harassment training, and more to reduce claims of employment discrimination and preventing sexual harassment in the workplace.

If you receive an EEOC or PHRC complaint, don't jump the gun to answer the charges. Carefully inspect the documents. If you don't question obvious problems now, such as lack of a verified signature, you lose the right to raise that issue later ...

A hospital secretary who suffered chronic arm pain after puncturing her thumb with a contaminated pin recently lost her disability-discrimination lawsuit ...

It’s not only illegal to discriminate against females in the work force, it’s also illegal to show bias against certain subsets of women ...

It seems safe to conclude that Georgia employers won't have to worry anytime soon about a state ban on sexual-orientation discrimination in the workplace ...

When you need to terminate an employee, it makes sense for the same manager who hired the employee to also pull the trigger on the firing. That bit of legal strategy—the so-called "same actor defense"—could help you defend a discrimination lawsuit down the road ...

When employees complain about a sexually hostile environment, it pays to remedy the situation … fast. That’s true even if you don’t believe the actions would amount to illegal harassment ...

Say the wrong thing during the hiring process, and you’ve got a lawsuit on your hands. Here are three tips to help keep supervisors’ feet out of their mouths ...

HR Law 101: The EEOC has become proactive in protecting workers from a sexually hostile environment. In 2007 alone, the agency recovered from employers nearly $50 million for victims of harassment ...

HR Law 101: When a new hire comes on board, you must determine whether to classify him or her as exempt or nonexempt under the FLSA. The key consideration: Exempt workers aren’t eligible for overtime pay. Rather, they’re paid for the job they do, not the hours they keep ...

HR Law 101: When an eligible employee returns from FMLA leave, the employer must restore him or her to the same position or an equivalent one with equivalent benefits, pay and other terms and conditions of employment. The new position must involve the same or substantially similar duties, responsibilities and authority ...